bradycardia

(redirected from bradycardiac)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

bradycardia:

see arrhythmiaarrhythmia
, disturbance in the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. Various arrhythmias can be symptoms of serious heart disorders; however, they are usually of no medical significance except in the presence of additional symptoms.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Bradycardia

 

decrease in frequency of heart contractions to less than 60 beats per minute.

Bradycardia may be found as a normal, constitutionally conditioned phenomenon in perfectly healthy persons, in well-trained athletes, and as one of the symptoms in many diseases. More often, bradycardia is observed as a result of organic disturbances of auriculoventricular conductivity—heart blockage, myocardial infarction, and inflammatory (infectious or toxic) diseases of the heart muscle. Complete blockage of the heart with a pulse frequency of 30–40 beats per minute or less threatens brain complications: loss of consciousness, convulsions, and cessation of heart activity. Prophylaxis and treatment are directed toward removal of the cause.

bradycardia

[¦brād·i¦kärd·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Slow heart rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
2,4-6,11,12,16,17] In contrast to the widely reported bradycardiac results of clonidine poisoning, there have been only a few reports of symptomatic bradycardia as a side effect of antihypertensive therapy (<0.
Studies in animals have demonstrated beneficial properties of essential oils on the cardiovascular system such as antithrombotic, antiplatelet, endothelial protective, vasore-laxant and hypotensive activity, recent accumulating evidences have shown that cardiovascular effects in humans, as improvements in coronary flow, and hypotensive and bradycardiac effects (de Menezes et al.
Studies in animals have demonstrated beneficial properties of essential oils on the cardiovascular system such as antithrombotic, antiplatelet, endothelial protective, vasorelaxant and hypotensive activity, recent accumulating evidences have shown that cardiovascular effects in humans, as improvements in coronary flow, and hypotensive and bradycardiac effects (de Menezes et al.