brain wave


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brain wave:

see electroencephalographyelectroencephalography
, science of recording and analyzing the electrical activity of the brain. Electrodes, placed on or just under the scalp, are linked to an electroencephalograph, which is an amplifier connected to a mechanism that converts electrical impulses into the
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brain wave

[′brān ‚wāv]
(physiology)
A rhythmic fluctuation of voltage between parts of the brain, ranging from about 1 to 60 hertz and 10 to 100 microvolts.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

brain wave

any of the fluctuations of electrical potential in the brain as represented on an electroencephalogram. They vary in frequency from 1 to 30 hertz
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
While this would lead us to expect only a partial correlation between the two measurement approaches at best, this does not explain the total lack of correlation between the Picture Sorts[R] and brain waves measurements.
The increase in alpha-2-beta brain waves during explicit learning "could reflect the building of a model of the task," Miller explains.
Researchers asked the volunteers to relax, concentrate or do an exercise in which they learned to control their own brain waves.
EEGs provide good real-time measurements of brain waves but lack precision in locating their source, while magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, provides good spatial maps but not in real time.
In 1987, when we introduced in the Philippines the internationally known inner mind control seminars, we used a small, battery-operated device that made pulsating sounds at the rate of seven to 14 cycles per second, which is within the alpha brain wave level.
Neurons transmit signals by electrical charges (similar to a battery) and hence give rise to signals that combine to form brain waves. These electrical patterns vary in intensity and frequency, qualities of electrical energy that can be measured by sensitive electrodes placed on a person's scalp.
Blue light also triggered brain waves suggesting that the volunteers were more awake.
These changes only happened during the breaks and were the only brain wave patterns that correlated with performance.
The importance of brain wave synchronicity The authors note that, so far, the working theory has been: This type of memory takes a hit later in life as a result of brain areas that would normally work together falling out of sync.
"This is a classic, well-studied brain wave response to a sensory input, termed event-related desynchronization, or alpha-ERD," says Shimojo, Gertrude Baltimore Professor of Experimental Psychology and affiliated faculty member of the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech.
For the study, appearing in the journal PLOS ONE, the team examined the brain wave patterns associated with language processing, including a pattern called the P600 -- a kind of "error signal" that occurs when a person encounters something linguistically unexpected.