brain wave


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brain wave:

see electroencephalographyelectroencephalography
, science of recording and analyzing the electrical activity of the brain. Electrodes, placed on or just under the scalp, are linked to an electroencephalograph, which is an amplifier connected to a mechanism that converts electrical impulses into the
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.

brain wave

[′brān ‚wāv]
(physiology)
A rhythmic fluctuation of voltage between parts of the brain, ranging from about 1 to 60 hertz and 10 to 100 microvolts.

brain wave

any of the fluctuations of electrical potential in the brain as represented on an electroencephalogram. They vary in frequency from 1 to 30 hertz
References in periodicals archive ?
During explicit learning tasks, there was an increase in alpha2-beta brain waves (oscillating at 10-30 hertz) following a correct choice, and an increase delta-theta waves (3-7 hertz) after an incorrect choice.
Neurofeedback assessments are used to capture information about an individual's brain wave performance.
Meanwhile, A Japanese research institute says it can tell what people are dreaming about by analyzing their brain waves.
Once the user puts on the prototype, it begins recording brain waves with very low set-up time.
Soon, the brain "learns" to operate within the normal brain wave activity ranges, and the patient often shows marked improvement.
Because brain wave data can be processed remotely, the company could provide services to anywhere in the world, and as such is an example of the emerging field of telemedicine.
The scans found that disturbed brain wave activity lasted for up to an hour after the phone call ended.
Farwell's device zeroes in on the activity of P300, a type of brain wave that "activates" when a person recognizes a familiar object, such as a crime weapon.
It takes tremendous effort--hundreds of hours of training--but eventually, the patient learns to concentrate on modulating a particular type of brain wave.
We've shown that this brain wave, which has been extensively studied in animals, appears in similar kinds of tasks in our human epileptic patients," says Michael Kahana, an assistant professor at Brandeis University.
People in one group with abnormal brain wave patterns react abnormally to light stimulation, while those in a second group with normal brain wave patterns also react abnormally to such stimulation.