brain-dead


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brain-dead

Brain-damaged in the extreme. It tends to imply terminal design failure rather than malfunction or simple stupidity.
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Supreme Council for Health chairman Lieutenant General Dr Shaikh Mohammed bin Abdulla also said his office would soon take steps to address the legal restrictions which currently do not support harvesting of organs from a brain-dead person.
His 37-year-old mother was declared brain-dead on February 20 after she suffered a brain haemorrhage.
Because of the limited kidney donors, it is imperative that we find another mechanism for kidney donation - organ donation after a person is brain-dead in accordance with religious, legal and medical practices," said the minister.
After doctors pronounced her brain-dead, she was kept on life support because of a state law that requires doctors to maintain life-sustaining care for pregnant patients.
DeFina said an examination of Jahi also revealed that her brain was still intact, rather than ''liquefying'' as would be expected if a brain-dead body was kept on life-support for many months.
In the world, the heart of a brain-dead patient could be kept alive for transplantation just for 72 hours but in this invention we can transplant the heart of the brain-dead patient into this machine and it can keep the heart alive for two months for re-transplantation," Elyasi Irayi told FNA.
Earlier in the day three surgical teams, including one from Osaka University Hospital, began extracting the heart, liver and kidneys from the boy who was declared brain-dead at Toyama University Hospital in the city of Toyama.
These tests will let doctors know whether Ben is brain-dead or not.
Sir - i write regarding your article "Labour worker's brain-dead slur against Welsh" (September 14).
But as we witnessed last year in the case of Terri Schiavo, trying to decipher choice when the person at issue is brain-dead can lead to a complicated mess.
An in-depth discussion explores how Buddhist and Shinto scholars have used fundamental concepts with each religious tradition to agree and disagree with the disclosure of an incurable disease to a patient, brain death, and brain-dead organ transplantation.
Sperling addresses the legal and ethical issues of maintaining the life of a brain-dead pregnant woman on life-support.