braincase


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to braincase: skull

braincase

[′brān‚kās]
(anatomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
The braincase also shows evidence for a change in posture as the animals grew.
Mean greatest length of skull, breadth of braincase, zygomatic breadt and post-orbital constriction was measured 12.48+-0.34mm, 6.45+-0.37mm, 6.55+-0.80mm and 3.36+-0.09mm, respectively.
The fossil only preserved bones from the left side of the braincase.
Using cutting-edge computerised tomography (CT) scanning technology, the research reveals new information including details of the rarely preserved braincase.
Modern humans have small, slender faces, large round braincases, and chins.
The revolutionary discovery got even more interesting when the team compared the restructured braincase with that of other modern-human ancestors.
However, the characters for which females were larger or equal to males (braincase width and length of m3 for Virginia in our eastern study; length of M1 and width of M1 for northern coastal Alaska in the western study) were at single sites and not statistically significant, suggesting these differences likely have little biological significance.
Unusual arrangements of 32 bony landmarks on the braincase appear in second-generation baboon hybrids, Cape Town physical anthropologist Terrence Ritzman said in another meeting presentation.
Human bodies have a number of adaptations to walking upright.7 In vertebrates, the foramen magnum, literally meaning "big hole," is a hole in the occipital bone in the base of the skull, through which the medulla oblongata extends from the braincase. In most mammals, including apes, the foramen magnum is situated behind the skull, as the head extends forward from the body.
14B-C), incomplete fused parietals (NSM012GF032.023), and the excellently preserved basicranial portion of a braincase (NSM012GF032.022; Fig.