implant

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Related to brainstem implant: cochlear implant, auditory brainstem implant

implant

Med anything implanted, esp surgically, such as a tissue graft or hormone

implant

[′im‚plant]
(medicine)
A quantity of radioactive material in a suitable container, intended to be embedded in a tissue or tumor for therapeutic purposes.
A tissue graft placed in depth in the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
When auditory nerve conduction is destroyed by either disease or trauma, auditory brainstem implants give patients hope of reconnecting with the outside world.
Auditory brainstem implant in posttraumatic cochlear nerve avulsion.
In June, international news agencies reported the case of a three-year-old boy believed to be the first child in the US to have had an auditory brainstem implant.
But finally she was successfully implanted with the auditory brainstem implant on February 14, which made it a very special Valentine's Day.
The 18-month-old is believed to be the youngest child in the world to have the pioneering brainstem implant.
He could become the youngest child in the world to have the brainstem implant in Milan.
"Our only option is an auditory brainstem implant. Only a handful of surgeons across the world are able to implant a tiny device onto Finn's brain stem where sound is processed.
The topics include anatomy and physiology associated with cochlear implantation, advanced bionics cochlear implants and sound processors, factors affecting the outcomes of children with cochlear implants, and auditory brainstem implants. (Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
Tam et al., "MRI without magnet removal in neurofibromatosis type 2 patients with cochlear and auditory brainstem implants," Otology & Neurotology, vol.
Implantable auditory technology — which, apart from cochlear implants, includes auditory brainstem implants, bone anchored hearing aids, and implantable middle ear devices — is an emerging field, and these devices represent a new era in hearing rehabilitation.

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