branch


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Related to branch: Branch Accounting

branch

1. a secondary woody stem arising from the trunk or bough of a tree or the main stem of a shrub
2. a subdivision of the stem or root of any other plant
3. US any small stream
4. Maths a section of a curve separated from the rest of the curve by discontinuities or special points
5. Computing a departure from the normal sequence of programmed instructions into a separate program area
6. Physics an alternative route in an atomic or nuclear decay series

Branch

 

an extension of a river. A branch is produced by sedimentation in the form of an alluvial islet or island or by breaks in meanders. A myriad of branches is especially characteristic of deltas. Less frequently, branches are produced when a current must bypass nonerodible rock projecting from the river bottom. Depending on changes in a stream’s regime, the current shapes alternating branches. A branch may become the principal stream when the original stream gradually shallows and turns into a secondary branch.

Local Russian names for branches include volozhka (Volga), poloi (Severnaia Dvina), rechishche (Dnieper), starodon’e (Don), and girlo (Danube). Secondary branches are called channels.


Branch

 

an organization that is a part of another organization, enterprise, or institution and that has the status of a juridical person. The branch performs some of the parent organization’s functions, frequently in a place other than the organization’s headquarters. In Soviet law, branches are established according to procedures specified in the legislation of the USSR and Union republics. In civil operations, a branch acts on behalf of the legal person that formed it; the authority to do so comes from a power of attorney given to the director of the branch (art. 31 of the Civil Code of the RSFSR). The status of a representative of a legal person differs from that of a branch in that the former always operates in a place other than the headquarters of the organization and performs some auxiliary, rather than primary, function or activity.

branch

[branch]
(botany)
A shoot or secondary stem on the trunk or a limb of a tree.
(computer science)
Any one of a number of instruction sequences in a program to which computer control is passed, depending upon the status of one or more variables.
(electricity)
A portion of a network consisting of one or more two-terminal elements in series. Also known as arm.
(engineering)
In a piping system, a pipe that originates in or discharges into another pipe. Also known as branch line.
(hydrology)
A small stream that merges into another, generally bigger, stream.
(mathematics)
A complex function which is analytic in some domain and which takes on one of the values of a multiple-valued function in that domain.
A section of a curve that is separated from other sections of the curve by discontinuities, singular points, or other special points such as maxima and minima.
(nuclear physics)
A product resulting from one mode of decay of a radioactive nuclide that has two or more modes of decay.
(organic chemistry)
(science and technology)
An area of study representing an independent offshoot of a related basic discipline.

branch

In plumbing, a pipe which originates in or discharges into a main, submain, riser, or stack.

branch

(mathematics)
An edge in a tree.

branch

(programming)
A jump.

branch

(1) In a low-level programming language, a statement that directs the computer to go to some other part of the program. In assembly languages, "branch" or "jump" instructions provide this capability. In high-level languages, a "goto" statement, as well as several other programming constructs, provide the equivalent of the branch. For example, "IF A EQUALS B GOTO MATCH_ROUTINE." See branch prediction and do loop.

(2) A connection between two blocks in a flowchart or two nodes in a network.
References in classic literature ?
The speakers of the two legislative branches are vice-presidents in the executive department.
I am now tall, and my branches spread like the others that were carried off last year!
"What is to happen now!" And the lights burned down to the very branches, and as they burned down they were put out one after the other, and then the children had permission to plunder the Tree.
High up among the branches of a mighty tree she hugged the shrieking infant to her bosom, and soon the instinct that was as dominant in this fierce female as it had been in the breast of his tender and beautiful mother--the instinct of mother love--reached out to the tiny man-child's half-formed understanding, and he became quiet.
The great tree with its entangling branches rose gradually from the panther, who, feeling the encumbering weight diminish, quickly crawled from beneath.
Many of the trees under which we passed had their branches bowed down with fruit, some of which were of familiar sorts, while other varieties were new.
But, look as I might, I found nothing but branches, beautiful branches that stood straight up before me, or spread gracefully over my head.
Notwithstanding our danger I could not help but laugh at Perry's frantic capers as he essayed to gain the safety of the lower branches of the trees he now had reached.
They have no speech of their own, but use the stolen words which they overhear when they listen, and peep, and wait up above in the branches. Their way is not our way.
From tree to tree swung Meriem working ever upward toward the smaller branches which would not bear the weight of her pursuers.
Tarzan had felt the instantaneous relaxation of the body beneath him after the heavy impact with the tree limb, and as the other turned completely over and started again upon its fall toward the ground, he reached forth a hand and caught the branch in time to stay his own descent, while the ape dropped like a plummet to the foot of the tree.
Around me, on all sides, were bushes and fern-like growths, and overhead and all about were the trunks and branches of forest trees.