branchial arch


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Related to branchial arch: branchial arch derivatives

branchial arch

[′braŋ·kē·əl ′ärch]
(vertebrate zoology)
One of the series of paired arches on the sides of the pharynx which support the gills in fishes and amphibians.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
BAPX1 expression in the first branchial arch marks a potential deleterious mechanism that can lead to oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (25).
In summary, we could not diagnose this case as first and second branchial arch syndrome.
Gill rakers in Cetorhinus maximus are present on both sides of each of the five branchial arches. From the inner edge of each arch extends a 10-cm diameter strip of mucous membrane (LACM 35876-1), and to either side of this lies a single continuous row of gill rakers with their free ends (filaments) directed towards the mouth.
(3,4) Embryologically, it is a derivative of the second branchial arch along with styloid ligament and the lesser cornu of the hyoid bone.
Distinguished from all other congeners by the combination of the following features: anterior portion of trunk slightly deeper than wide, jaws slightly elongated, snout pointed, tip of anal fin slightly pointed in male, caudal fin rounded in male, pelvic-fin tip reaching anterior portion of anal-fin base in male, dorsal-fin origin on vertical between base of penultimate and last anal-fin ray, dorsal-fin rays 7-9, anal-fin rays 13-15, frontal squamation E or D-patterned, frontal scales arranged circularly, canal preopercular short and opened, contact organs on flank scales in male, longitudinal series of scales 40-45, gill rakers of first branchial arch 2 + 10, pink stripes on flank, jaws not distinctively pigmented, and round black spot on dorsal portion of caudal fin in female.
Fourth branchial arch sinus: Clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, and surgical treatment.
(1,2) The styloid process is a derivative of the Reichert cartilage of the 2nd branchial arch and along with the stylohyoid ligament and the lesser horn of the hyoid bone, it forms the stylohyoid complex.
Differentiating third and fourth branchial cleft cysts from each other can be difficult due to close proximity, but the relationship of the sinus tract to the superior laryngeal nerve (derived from the 4th branchial arch) surgically is helpful.
Gill-rakers were counted on first left branchial arch. The following counts were taken: 1) Number of teeth on premaxillary; 2) Number of teeth on dentary; 3) Number of teeth on maxillary; 4) Number of scales in lateral line; 5) Number of scales in transversal line; 6) Number of circumpeduncular scale series; 7) Number of dorsal-fin rays; 8) Number of pectoral-fin rays; 9) Number of pelvic-fin rays; 10) Number of anal-fin rays; 11) Number of caudal fin rays; 12) Number of gill-rakers on first left-side branchial arch.
Summary of soft anal rays, pectoral rays, and total gill rakers on the first branchial arch for three species of Amphiprion.
Our differential diagnoses included branchial arch remnant, cervical rib, lymph node or ingested migrated fish bone.