branchial arch

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Related to Branchial arches: Branchial cyst, branchial fistula

branchial arch

[′braŋ·kē·əl ′ärch]
(vertebrate zoology)
One of the series of paired arches on the sides of the pharynx which support the gills in fishes and amphibians.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
aureus uses crossflow filtration rather than deadend sieving or hydrosol filtration to retain suspended food particles inside the oropharyngeal cavity as filtrate exits between the gill rakers and between the branchial arches.
Styloid process and ligament are derived from first and second branchial arches and Reichert's cartilage.
(1) It is postulated that these are developmental lesions derived from remnants of the cartilaginous matrix of the second and third branchial arches. (2,4) Another possibility is that osseous choristomas may represent reactive lesions that result from trauma or chronic irritation.
Prevention of retinoic acid-induced early craniofacial abnormalities by folinic acid and expression of endothelin-1/dHAND in the branchial arches in mouse.
The development of the tongue starts at the fourth week of intrauterine life in the floor of the primitive cavity from the first three or four branchial arches. Abnormal/partial/ non-fusion of these arches may lead to congenital anomalies of tongue, including bifid tongue.
(37) By the 4th week of embryonic life, 4-paired mesodermal arches are apparent externally, with smaller 5th and 6th branchial arches not well visualized.
When the fish eggs hatched, the two found the branchial arches - bits of cartilage that support the gills and correspond to parts of the jaw in humans - appeared altered.
The visceral arches include the mandibular arch, constituted by the mandibular and hyoidean arches and the branchial arches which sustains the gills.
However, interactions between rhombomeric segments of the hindbrain, neural crest cells, and branchial arches are thought to be influenced by overlapping expression domains of Hox genes; moreover, the anterior-posterior patterning of the head is regulated by a Hox code in the branchial region (Hunt et al., 1991) that may be influenced by endogenous RA.