branch

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branch

1. a secondary woody stem arising from the trunk or bough of a tree or the main stem of a shrub
2. a subdivision of the stem or root of any other plant
3. US any small stream
4. Maths a section of a curve separated from the rest of the curve by discontinuities or special points
5. Computing a departure from the normal sequence of programmed instructions into a separate program area
6. Physics an alternative route in an atomic or nuclear decay series

Branch

 

an extension of a river. A branch is produced by sedimentation in the form of an alluvial islet or island or by breaks in meanders. A myriad of branches is especially characteristic of deltas. Less frequently, branches are produced when a current must bypass nonerodible rock projecting from the river bottom. Depending on changes in a stream’s regime, the current shapes alternating branches. A branch may become the principal stream when the original stream gradually shallows and turns into a secondary branch.

Local Russian names for branches include volozhka (Volga), poloi (Severnaia Dvina), rechishche (Dnieper), starodon’e (Don), and girlo (Danube). Secondary branches are called channels.


Branch

 

an organization that is a part of another organization, enterprise, or institution and that has the status of a juridical person. The branch performs some of the parent organization’s functions, frequently in a place other than the organization’s headquarters. In Soviet law, branches are established according to procedures specified in the legislation of the USSR and Union republics. In civil operations, a branch acts on behalf of the legal person that formed it; the authority to do so comes from a power of attorney given to the director of the branch (art. 31 of the Civil Code of the RSFSR). The status of a representative of a legal person differs from that of a branch in that the former always operates in a place other than the headquarters of the organization and performs some auxiliary, rather than primary, function or activity.

branch

[branch]
(botany)
A shoot or secondary stem on the trunk or a limb of a tree.
(computer science)
Any one of a number of instruction sequences in a program to which computer control is passed, depending upon the status of one or more variables.
(electricity)
A portion of a network consisting of one or more two-terminal elements in series. Also known as arm.
(engineering)
In a piping system, a pipe that originates in or discharges into another pipe. Also known as branch line.
(hydrology)
A small stream that merges into another, generally bigger, stream.
(mathematics)
A complex function which is analytic in some domain and which takes on one of the values of a multiple-valued function in that domain.
A section of a curve that is separated from other sections of the curve by discontinuities, singular points, or other special points such as maxima and minima.
(nuclear physics)
A product resulting from one mode of decay of a radioactive nuclide that has two or more modes of decay.
(organic chemistry)
(science and technology)
An area of study representing an independent offshoot of a related basic discipline.

branch

In plumbing, a pipe which originates in or discharges into a main, submain, riser, or stack.

branch

(mathematics)
An edge in a tree.

branch

(programming)
A jump.

branch

(1) In a low-level programming language, a statement that directs the computer to go to some other part of the program. In assembly languages, "branch" or "jump" instructions provide this capability. In high-level languages, a "goto" statement, as well as several other programming constructs, provide the equivalent of the branch. For example, "IF A EQUALS B GOTO MATCH_ROUTINE." See branch prediction and do loop.

(2) A connection between two blocks in a flowchart or two nodes in a network.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Feminist Print Media" and "Update on Feminist Periodicals" were written and submitted two and five years after Branching Out folded, but because they rely on contemporary and historical data to outline the "social impact and financial context of feminist newspapers and magazines in Canada," they provide invaluable insight into the field in which Branching Out operated.
Wachtel goes on to characterize Branching Out in terms of a readers survey conducted by Branching Out in 1975; this survey "revealed that many subscribed not simply because it was feminist, but Canadian feminist" (16).
From its inception, Branching Out positioned itself as a rival of both Ms.
Branching Out defined itself in relationship to three distinct categories of feminist periodical publishing: as a Canadian version of Ms., an overtly feminist version of Chatelaine, and a newsstand-friendly version of radical feminist liberation newspapers and magazines.
Unlike Branching Out, which sought a larger and more mainstream audience and had the production quality to sit on the newsstand next to Chatelaine, small-scale feminist periodicals tended to have amateur aesthetics; they were often mimeographed and stapled, in the form of a small community newsletter, or printed as tabloid newspapers.