Branchiopoda

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Branchiopoda

[‚braŋ·kē′äp·ə·də]
(invertebrate zoology)
A subclass of crustaceans containing small or moderate-sized animals commonly called fairy shrimps, clam shrimps, and water fleas.

Branchiopoda

 

a subclass of the class Crustacea. The head is not fused with the front thoracic segments. There is no mandibular palp, and both the maxilla and mandible are weakly developed. The thoracic limbs are foliate and nonsegmented as a rule; they are used for locomotion, breathing, and bringing food to the mouth. The nerve stems of the ventral nerve cord are widely spaced. There are from four to 11 (rarely as many as 19) thoracic segments. The cephalothoracic carapace is shaped like a shield or a bivalve shell or is entirely absent. The animals live mainly in fresh water. The subclass comprises three orders: Anostraca, Phyllopoda, and Lipostraca (represented only by extinct forms).

References in periodicals archive ?
Population genetic structure of a California endemic branchiopod, Branchinecta sandiegoensis.
And I realized that this brain actually comprises three successive neuropils in the optic regions, which is a trait of malacostracans, not branchiopods," he said.
Co-occurrence of branchiopods in ephemeral pools is not unusual.
After the first subsequent rains, the invertebrate fauna in these particular pans consisted of many "typical" temporary pan invertebrates, including various large branchiopods like: Anostraca (Fairy shrimp), Conchostraca (Clam shrimp), and Notostraca (Tadpole shrimp).
We have also obtained partial sequences of phenoloxidases from the branchiopods Triops longicaudatus and Artemia franciscana, crustaceans that synthesize extracellular hemoglobin for oxygen transport.
Structural studies of a branchiopod crustacean (Lepidurus bilobatus) extracellular hemoglobin.
Smith, unpub.) Surprisingly, three genes that define the identity of diverse trunk segments in insects (Antp, Ubx, and abd-A) are all expressed throughout the thorax of the branchiopod crustacean Artemia, but are not expressed in the postgenital abdomen (12).
Now we have shown that the heartbeat of the branchiopod Triops longicaudatus is myogenic, and that the heart muscle acts as a diffuse pacemaker.
Tadpole shrimp (Triops longicaudatus LeConte) are primitive branchiopod crustaceans that face extreme environmental conditions in the ephemeral desert pools that they inhabit.
The same can be found in crustacean lineages, as branchiopods, ostracods, copepods, cirripeds, and decapods that lost HcA and presented Hb for handling oxygen (Ter-williger and Ryan, 2001).
Field evidence of dispersal of branchiopods, ostracods and bryozoans by teal (Anas crecca) in the Camargue (southern France).