branding

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branding

Applying a trade name to a product or service. It also refers to developing awareness of the name. Branding is always important, but in the early days of the Internet, it was a major hot topic and tactic. Companies spent a fortune attempting to gain market awareness, no matter how much money they lost. See cross promotion.
References in periodicals archive ?
and by third parties, Sartain and Schumann build a strong case for the power of the employer brand to strengthen the business and meet strategic goals.
This year, the firm is spinning its brand off of a series of initiatives planned for its 100th anniversary (Coldwell Banker was founded in San Francisco in 1906) including a commemorative coffee table book and a Hall of Fame timeline featuring the companies and industry leaders which have played such a vital role in the company's evolution.
An ideal guiding coalition has eight to 10 people all of whom have an appreciation of what brand marketing can do for the institution.
The goal was to launch a fully developed brand at an internal meeting in February 2004--a tight timeline for any private-sector company developing a new brand, let alone a government organization.
From considered critiques such as Naomi Klein's No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, to the less considered concrete-block-through-Starbucks-window, which is now apparently de rigueur at anti-globalization demos, brands are also under attack.
Perhaps the most important of these is that we realize that a brand is much more complicated, much more robust, much more strategically significant than we thought even two years ago, when a lot of economic activity was implicitly governed by the idea that "If we build it, they will come.
Figure 8: The Travelocity credit card rewards consumers for staying loyal to the brand.
The opportunity for growth and sustainable market share centers on proper brand management.
It became fashionable to view a brand as a promise--a guarantee of a certain quality or aesthetic experience extended by a firm to its customers.
Despite its success, there are doubters to the value of brand management.