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bran,

outer coat of a cereal grain—e.g., wheat, rye, and corn—mechanically removed from commercial flour and meal by bolting or sifting. Wheat bran is extensively used as feed for farm animals. Bran is used as food for humans (in cereals or mixed with flour in bread) to add roughage (i.e., cellulose) to the diet. It is also used in dyeing and calico printing.

Bran

 

a miling by-product consisting of the seed coat of various grains and the remains of unsorted flour. There are wheat, rye, barley, rice, buckwheat, and other types of bran. Depending on the degree of pulverization, bran may be coarse or fine. Bran, primarily wheat and rye bran, is a valuable feed for all types of agricultural animals. The nutritional value of bran depends on the content of flour particles (the less flour and the more shell, the lower the nutritional value). The average composition of wheat bran is 14.8 percent water, 15.5 percent protein, 3.2 percent fat, 8.4 percent cellulose, 53.2 percent nitrogen-free extractive substances, and 4.9 percent ash. One hundred kg of bran contains 71–78 feed units and 12.5–13 kg of digestible protein. A high bran content in bread reduces digestibility, whereas a small amount of bran improves the taste of the bread and increases peristalsis. Flax bran is used for poultices, and mustard bran for mustard plasters. Almond bran is used as a softening agent for the face and hands.

Bran

god whose cauldron restored dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]
See: Death

Bran

god whose cauldron restored the dead to life. [Welsh Myth.: Jobes, 241]

bran

husks of cereal grain separated from the flour by sifting
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the product color and aroma improved as rice and wheat bran content increased, high levels of brans caused the crust to brown and the crumb to become very firm.
What's more, although many studies have found a lower risk of disease in people who eat more whole grains or more grain fiber (from breads, cereals, pasta, rice, etc.), a few have looked at bran alone.
It's flavored with just enough cane juice, honey, and fruit juice concentrate to give it a tad over one teaspoon of sugar per serving, the same as a bowl of Post Bran Flakes.
You've got white and rye, whole wheat and pumpernickel, oat bran and oatmeal.
There are mainly two groups of phenolic acids in wheat bran: hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives.
However,the group of rats fed on maize bran diet had a significantly (p85% protein###200.000
Sharma, "Total phenolic content of cereal brans using conventional and microwave assisted extraction," American Journal of Food Technology, vol.
First, all brans were mixed into 90% lean ground beef to form patties at 5% bran levels.
Another ARS study has shown flavor differences arising from various colored brans in whole-grain rice.
Rice is categorized into seven classes based on bran color: white, light brown, speckled brown, brown, red, variable purple, and purple.
There has been a trend to incorporate bran from various sources into cereal products such as high protein- fiber source [3].
Epidemiologic studies have reported an association of reduced risk of coronary artery disease in populations with increased fiber intake.[1,2] Dietary fiber, specifically soluble fiber, has been shown to have important lipid-lowering effect.[3] Oat bran, a rich source of the soluble fiber [beta]-glucan, has demonstrated significant reduction in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in both animal and human studies.[4-8] The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), in its dietary recommendations, has pointed out that the addition of soluble fiber, such as that found in beans and oats, has been shown to be a beneficial adjunct to a heart-healthy diet.[9]