brayer


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brayer

[′brā·ər]
(graphic arts)
A soft rubber roller attached to a wooden or metal handle; used to ink blocks, stones, or printing plates.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the block print projects, I always check to make sure I have the brayers, plates, ink, cutters, blocks, paper, and all the extra materials needed for my entire grade level.
* use printmaking terminology such as brayer, baren and water-based inks when discussing printmaking.
Blue insulation foam and white thin Styrofoam (in 7 x 7" [18 x 18 cm] squares), rubber cement, glue, assorted no-fade art paper, pencils, rulers, printing inks, brayers
9 x 12" (23 x 31 cm) drawing paper, pencils, carbon paper, 9 x 12" (23 x 31 cm) chipboard or mat board, white glue in squeeze bottles, brayers, printing ink, plate glass for rolling ink, 12 x 18" (31 x 46 cm) construction and other types of paper to print on, printing press (optional)
I have a brayer, plastic washable ink tray, 12" x 18" background paper and a piece of 9" x 12" inking paper.
Aces: Alivia Reed, 2; Brayer Denton, 1; Sims, 1; Hamilton, 1.
Out of them, a Container Vessel, Atlantic Flosta sailed out to sea on Monday morning, and three ships Shem Rock Mercury, Sea Brayer and Sea Ambition are expected to sail on same day in the afternoon.
Ink is then applied and paper is pressed onto the surface, either by hand, brayer, or printing press.
Lynda Burstein Brayer is an Israeli-trained human rights lawyer, and she affirms the legal and moral right Palestinians have to armed struggle against Israel's occupation, noting, "This document [UN resolution 37/43] legitimises all national liberation struggles, including, at this time in history, most particularly, the Palestinian people's struggle for its own freedom.
Curated by Frederic Migayrou, Marie-Ange Brayer, and Frank Madlener
Brayer (Professor of Biblical Literature at Yeshiva University), in his book, 'The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature,' it was the custom of Jewish women to go out in public with a head covering which, sometimes, even covered the whole face leaving one eye free.