breaking stress

breaking stress

[′brāk·iŋ ‚stres]
(mechanics)
The stress required to fracture a material whether by compression, tension, or shear.

breaking stress

The stress at which a component ruptures under a tensile force.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We focused on breaking points in the compression tests and evaluated several mechanical parameters, namely, breaking force, breaking energy, breaking stress, breaking strain, and breaking elasticity.
The modulus at a given strain, breaking stress and elongation-at-break were obtained from the stress-strain curves.
However, the average fiber diameter of the mats is larger than 200 nm and the breaking stress is not very high.
In compression tests, the tapioca starch-xanthan gum gels exhibited lower Young's modulus (E) and breaking stress values than those of gels made with tapioca starch alone, after a storage period of greater than seven days, indicating that xanthan gum delayed the retrogradation in tapioca starch gels.
Breaking tests of thin silicon foils with similar geometry determine an average breaking stress of 287.5 MPa as published elsewhere [1].
The most commonly specified mechanical properties of polymers include stiffness and breaking stress are flexural modulus and tensile strength.
4b shows that surface compression gives reliable value for the average breaking stress.
For instance, the average stress during the drawing phase is spread out between 9.5 and 12.5 MPa, whereas the nominal breaking stress reached approximately the value of 19 MPa.
If you try to find a correlation between fracture bending stress and average diameter of the indentation we recognize that the larger the indentation the less is the scatter range of the breaking stress, see Fig.
There is a good correlation between the collagen (i.e., connective tissue protein) content and the toughness of abalone, as measured by breaking stress assays, with a lower collagen content (more tender) product being preferred by sensory panels (Olaechea et al.
It has a breaking stress (stress in GPa at the breaking point) comparable to steel and presents a toughness (i.e., the breaking energy given by the area under the stress-strain curve) that surpasses Kevlar[R] fibres.