seizure

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Related to breakthrough seizure: epilepsy

seizure

Pathol a sudden manifestation or recurrence of a disease, such as an epileptic convulsion

Seizure

 

a pathological neuropsychic state that arises in an abrupt fitlike manner. Seizures frequently take the form of convulsions or other involuntary movements accompanied by clouding of consciousness. This stage is later replaced by a deep pathological sleep or stupor. Epilepsy, hysteria, and diseases of the brain can produce seizures. Seizures may occur in the form of a sudden relaxation of muscle tone (cataplectic seizure) or a sudden falling asleep (narcoleptic seizure). The term “seizure” is also used in the broader sense of paroxysm.

seizure

[′sē·zhər]
(medicine)
The sudden onset or recurrence of a disease or an attack.
Specifically, an epileptic attack, fit, or convulsion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cost savings in the less expensive medications may be lost when overall health costs and societal consequences are taken into account for those patients who experience breakthrough seizures or troublesome side effects when switched from their usual seizure medicine.
But the agency's accepted bioequivalence range of 80%125% could put some patients at risk for breakthrough seizures or increased side effects, Dr.
Such situations would include status epilepticus; repeated new seizures (excluding most withdrawal seizures, for example); breakthrough seizures with a low anticonvulsant level; and a first seizure with a high likelihood of repeating, as with a demonstrated focal brain lesion.
He continued to have breakthrough seizures and 2 months later was changed to carbamazepine (Tegretol).
Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn can cause falls, injuries or seizure emergencies.
There are several other instances when monitoring is of great value, including when the desired therapeutic goal is reached, when noncompliance is suspected, when breakthrough seizures occur, when drug-drug interactions are a concern, when side effects occur, and when other drugs are added or removed.