breakwater


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breakwater,

offshore structure to protect a harbor from wave energy or deflect currents. When it also serves as a pier, it is called a quay; when covered by a roadway it is called a mole. In the United States a breakwater commonly consists of a long mound of stone rubble and of cheaper materials like rubber tires and oil drums. The flow of waves up its slope, and the formation of swirls by its rough surface dissipate wave energy. A pneumatic breakwater consists of perforated pipes discharging air bubbles; another type has underwater pipes that direct streams of water against approaching waves to cause them to break. Breakwaters are also used to promote sedimentation, which, depending on the breakwater's alignment, will infill to produce a stable beach. The Chesapeake breakwater was the first built in the United States. See coast protectioncoast protection,
methods used to protect coastal lands from erosion. Beaches can exist only where a delicate dynamic equilibrium exists between the amount of sand supplied to the beach and the inevitable losses caused by wave erosion.
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breakwater

[′brāk‚wȯd·ər]
(civil engineering)
A wall built into the sea to protect a shore area, harbor, anchorage, or basin from the action of waves.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

breakwater

1. a massive wall built out into the sea to protect a shore or harbour from the force of waves
2. another name for groyne
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
An application from marina bosses has now landed on the desk of council planners which involves a whole-scale rebuild of the marina and new sea defences to replace the former floating breakwaters.
"More than 240,000m3 of material has been laid below the water's surface for the south breakwater, to a length of 600m."
Production on site is a critical factor because a breakwater typically requires several thousand Cubipods, which would be costly to transport.
A slight lull over the winter has been replaced by a period of intense activity, with five concrete caissons arriving within three months, and continued work on both breakwaters, piling operations and dredging.
He said the man was quickly located by the crew of the larger Atlantic 85 lifeboat around 50 metres from the breakwater and brought on to the vessel.
Caption: LISTING--The Damavand, the largest ship the Iranian Navy has in the Caspian Sea, lists to starboard after running into the breakwater at the right of the photo.
The wave transmission is also tested to check whether the buoy motion affects the intrinsic performance of the breakwater. In Section 4, the conclusions are drawn.
LUCKY ESCAPE Lads engulfed by waves as they stand on breakwater
"We were horrified when these two young lads walked along the breakwater in such dangerous conditions.
An RNLI spokeswoman said the wave had swept the fisherman from the breakwater into the sea, where he made fruitless attempts to cling onto the pier.
Reports said that the strong waves also caused a tugboat named "T-Boat Meni Plus One" to slam into the barge, preventing it from ramming into the breakwater, which is just about 20 meters away.