breastwork


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breastwork

[′brest‚wərk]
(ordnance)
Earthwork, constructed wholly or partly above the surface of the ground, which gives protection for defenders in a standing position, firing over the crest.

breastwork

1. Masonry work for a chimney breast.
2. The parapet of a building.
3. A defensive wall, hastily constructed, about breast high, often protecting the summit of a mound.
References in periodicals archive ?
We read that in the 1850s others were exacerbating the problem by "cutting down the banks of the Harbour and carting soil into the Bay without any breastwork, [doing] much mischief.
BREASTWORK, as any military historian will tell you, is the technical word used to describe a defensive wall.
The best over-all shape is approximately tear-drop, the upper end rounded off, the deep end at the dam somewhat flattened across the inner surface of the breastwork.
Work gangs cleared and staked out fields of fire, while each regiment was assigned a 100-yard sector along a defensive line of trenches that were protected by a log breastwork topped with sandbags.
This point was vividly driven home to Jedediah Smith and the other members of his shore trading party as they huddled behind a gruesome breastwork of dead and wounded horses.
The existing 1970s timber groynes and breastwork defences just weren't up to the job.
Make ready, make ready, Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, Make ready, make ready, Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh Look hither, look hither, I build a breastwork for you, Look hither, look hither, I build a breastwork for you A cock and a hen, They attack, attack, attack It is tabu for me to slumber Except to the sound of breakers Your ship is sunk below, Don't think I'm drowned too.
The author has published a number of books on the Civil War and other historical battle engagements but this book has photographic renderings of ancient relics and breastworks utilized by both Union and Confederate forces.
From the reconstructed breastworks, one can see the fields of fire available to the British and their colonial allies and the advantages offered by the depth of their defenses for internal lines of maneuver and sustainment.
Focusing, therefore, on generalships, command decisions, strategy, and tactics, while not ignoring the role social and political forces played in conditioning the views and attitudes (and thereby morale) of ordinary soldiers, he argues that the tactical deadlock of the first years of the war did not result solely from the inherent superiority of the power of the defensive, the rifled musket, and breastworks, as has been argued elsewhere, but also combined rampant command inexperience and failure to recognize offensive opportunities.
As the Confederates drove the Federals back, First Lieutenant McCammon took command of Company F in a desperate defense of the breastworks.
Forced into their breastworks during the night, the entrenched Federals became much more difficult.