breath test

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breath test

Brit a chemical test of a driver's breath to determine the amount of alcohol he has consumed
References in periodicals archive ?
Abercynon-based IMSPEX Diagnostics is developing a breath analysis device to improve diagnosis of bacterial and viral infections
By using breath analysis to measure the concentrations of these gases, the objective is to detect specified substances that are effective in the early detection of lifestyle diseases, leading to improved lifestyle habits.
Also, in order to make this technology a useful method of screening for early detection of lifestyle diseases, Fujitsu Laboratories aims to conduct joint research with medical institutions to test the biological and medical results of breath analysis.
Faulty results were reportedly also issued on breath analysis tests in Essex, Norfolk and Suffolk counties, according to a story in the Globe.
This breath analysis method presents the potential for a cheaper and more reliable diagnostic option for patients found to have bulky disease on a CT scan.
The tests included the pre-flight breath analysis of pilots and cabin crew, with the breathalyser equipment being non-functional, they said.
Environmental researchers, atmospheric chemists and food and flavor scientists can count on this solutions, as well as those completing breath analysis, indoor air specialists and engine exhaust testers.
Only recently, however, has the mainstream medical establishment come to view the idea of breath analysis as anything more than, as one researcher described it, a bizarre curiosity.
Medical, biological, chemical, and engineering specialists review developments in breath analysis since 2005, when the previous volume was completed.
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found a way to use exhaled breath analysis to help determine whether a patient has heart failure.
In collaboration with Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling, Teranishi carried out the first scientific studies of breath analysis in the early 1970s, demonstrating that human breath contains more than 200 volatile organic compounds.