breath-hold diving

breath-hold diving

[′breth ‚hōld ‚div·iŋ]
(engineering)
A form of diving without the use of any artificial breathing mixtures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ergozen describes a patient with subconjunctival hemorrhage associated with ocular barotrauma resulting from the use of swimming goggles during breath-hold diving, and presents preventative measures that can be taken to avoid this traumatic side effect of pressure changes while diving (see pages 296-297).
Freediving, breath-hold diving, or skin diving is a form of underwater diving that relies on the ability to hold their breath until resurfacing, rather than on the use of a breathing apparatus such as scuba gear.
The revisions from November 2014 effect changes in mishap and near-mishap reporting, planning and ORM, breath-hold diving, and calculation of SCUBA air supply.
Presented at: The Physiology of Breath-Hold Diving, Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society Workshop.
The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.
The new research was conducted by Swedish scientists on 12 healthy volunteers who were trained in breath-hold diving.
No-Limits is banned in competitions by the world federation for breath-hold diving, known as Aida [Association Internationale pour le Developpement de l'Apnee], but still open to record attempts, pushing divers to go deeper and deeper," said Haith.
Safe breath-hold diving requires an appreciation of the risks involved and strategies for protecting yourself.
In freediving, also known as breath-hold diving, the undersea hunter holds his breath for as long as two minutes while stalking prey with a spear.
As a sport, freediving's roots trace back to the late '40s, while the activity of breath-hold diving, freediving as it is commonly referred to today, can be traced back 4,500 years.
He had sent him breath-hold diving on a full stomach, shortly after an evening meal.
Explain to children at a young age what shallow-water blackout is and why they should never practice breath-hold diving