delivery

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delivery

1. Sport
a. the act or manner of bowling or throwing a ball
b. the ball so delivered
2. Law an actual or symbolic handing over of property, a deed, etc.
3. Engineering the discharge rate of a compressor or pump
4. (in South Africa) the supply of basic services to communities deprived under apartheid
References in periodicals archive ?
Simulation training and resident performance of singleton vaginal breech delivery.
0 ABD = Assisted breech delivery, C/S = Caesarean section, SVD = Spontaneous vaginal delivery Table 5.
Emergency CS was booked, but she progressed to the second stage of labour, and an assisted breech delivery was attended by a medical officer.
Had doctors reviewed Pauline's notes from her previous four pregnancies, they would have realised she had a fibroid and had endured a previous breech delivery.
If they had seen records of Pauline Loraine's previous four births, they would have realised she had a "fibroid" in her womb and endured a previous breech delivery.
Fifteen minutes later, a premature but healthy baby girl came out feet first, a breech delivery.
Pugh's failure to seek medical help during the breech delivery in the bathroom of her former home at 263 Purchase St.
Erb's palsy might follow a difficult forceps delivery, (the Emperor Wilhelm 1st of Germany at the time of the First World War had this deformity, which he hid under a long cloak), while Klumke's palsy might result from a difficult breech delivery with an after-coming arm.
Developmental dysplasia of the hip: This problem is more frequent in children of a breech delivery.
They preferred the term "intact dilation and extraction," better to keep anyone from understanding what they were talking about: namely, the partial breech delivery of a baby, until an abortionist can pierce its skull with a sharp instrument and vacuum out its brains.
These expensive models are often purchased by academic institutions that are interested in simulation for a multitude of purposes, including team training, but such models are not necessary to simulate at least several obstetric emergencies, including vaginal breech delivery, shoulder dystocia, and the use of forceps.