breeze

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breeze

Meteorol a wind of force two to six inclusive on the Beaufort scale
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

breeze

[brēz]
(meteorology)
A light, gentle, moderate, fresh wind.
In the Beaufort scale, a wind speed ranging from 4 to 31 miles (6.4 to 49.6 kilometers) per hour.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pan breeze, breeze

Small bits of coke and furnace clinker from the pan beneath a coke oven; suitable for use as aggregate in lightweight concrete block.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"Many thanks, kind Spring!" cried Ripple, as she floated away on the breeze; "give a kindly word to the mother who waits on the shore, and tell her I have not forgotten my vow, but hope soon to see her again."
Then on went the never-tiring Breeze, over forest, hill, and field, till the sky grew dark, and bleak winds whistled by.
Not the slightest movement in the vessel had been perceptible in the cabin; not a sound had been audible indicating the rising of the breeze. The owner of the yacht--accustomed to the sea, capable, if necessary, of sailing his own vessel--had surely committed a strange mistake!
"Here is the breeze, this time," he exclaimed, "and no mistake!"
He was not very big, and he walked rather stiffly and uncertainly on his paper legs; but he had a pleasant face, with very red cheeks and very blue eyes, and he bowed so low to the strangers that Dorothy laughed, and the breeze from her mouth nearly blew the Captain over.
But they were so thin that I found that any breeze would blow them over and scatter them dreadfully; so Glinda found this lonely place for me, where few people ever come.
The water was rising higher and higher, and the gusts, forerunners of a steady breeze, were growing stiffer and stiffer.
I waited for more light; the breeze began to fail on my face.
It showed Pearl in an unwonted aspect Heretofore, the mother, while loving her child with the intensity of a sole affection, had schooled herself to hope for little other return than the waywardness of an April breeze, which spends its time in airy sport, and has its gusts of inexplicable passion, and is petulant in its best of moods, and chills oftener than caresses you, when you take it to your bosom; in requital of which misdemeanours it will sometimes, of its own vague purpose, kiss your cheek with a kind of doubtful tenderness, and play gently with your hair, and then be gone about its other idle business, leaving a dreamy pleasure at your heart.
The cold evening breeze, of which I have spoken, whistled through every chink of the rude building and sprinkled the floor with a continual rain of fine sand.
The breeze subsided a little towards noon, and set in from the south-west.
Over the pavilion, which was of green silk and cloth of gold, countless banners waved in the breeze. Just in front of this, and connected with it by a runway had been built a broad platform, so that all the spectators could see plainly the entertainment provided for them.