bridle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

bridle

1. a headgear for a horse, etc., consisting of a series of buckled straps and a metal mouthpiece (bit) by which the animal is controlled through the reins
2. a Y-shaped cable, rope, or chain, used for holding, towing, etc
3. Machinery a device by which the motion of a component is limited, often in the form of a linkage or flange

bridle

[′brīd·əl]
(engineering)
A pumping unit cable that is looped over the horse head and then connected to the carrier bar; supports the polished-rod clamp.
References in classic literature ?
At the critical moment before the jump is taken, I am foolish enough to seize the bridle, and suddenly check the pony.
This done, he disappears in the mist, with the bridle hanging loose, and the pony's nose to the ground, as before.
First, a stiff heavy collar just on my neck, and a bridle with great side-pieces against my eyes called blinkers, and blinkers indeed they were, for I could not see on either side, but only straight in front of me; next, there was a small saddle with a nasty stiff strap that went right under my tail; that was the crupper.
Winkle, who was still at the end of the bridle, at a rather quicker rate than fast walking, in the direction from which they had just come.
The walls were decorated with several hunting-whips, two or three bridles, a saddle, and an old rusty blunderbuss, with an inscription below it, intimating that it was 'Loaded'--as it had been, on the same authority, for half a century at least.
The mule was shy, and was so frightened at her bridle being seized that rearing up she flung her rider to the ground over her haunches.
And he took the Sheriff's horse by the bridle rein, and led him through the lane and by many a thicket till the main road was reached.
He emphasized the words "some one," and loosing the horse's bridle,--
He turned up by the road he had come from the chateau, Rouletabille still retaining his hold on the horse's bridle.
D'Artagnan and Porthos were now alone with a man who held by the bridles two horses; they thought it was Musqueton and went up to him.
Hence John, standing with his hand upon the horse's bridle, and his great eyes on the rider, and with nothing passing to divert his thoughts, had really got some of these little circumstances into his brain by the time he was called upon to speak.
Still holding the shoe, he looked at the array of horsehair bridles on the walls.