bright stock

bright stock

[′brīt ‚stäk]
(materials)
High-viscosity refined and dewaxed lubricating oils used in the compounding of motor oils.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, certain grades of Group I such as Bright Stock will continue their popular streak in regions such as South America, Asia Pacific, and the Middle East.
Occasionally, pages in the regular edition and special sections will be printed on 35-37 pound bright stock, in either normal tabloid size or in an 8-1/2 by 11, stitched and trimmed magazine format, as requested by the Office of Student Media.
The Yanbu Refinery expansion is expected to increase base oil production to meet future demands for high quality GR-II and GR-III base oils, increase the GR-I Bright stock to almost double current production, produce higher-value byproducts (naphtha, diesel, and kerosene), and satisfy Kingdom requirements for producing drilling fluid, which is currently being imported.
The Yanbu refinery expansion is expected to increase base oil production to meet future demands for high quality GR-II and GR-III base oils; increase the GR-I Bright stock to almost double current production; produce higher-value byproducts (naphtha, diesel, and kerosene); and satisfy Kingdom requirements for producing drilling fluid, which is currently being imported.
However, certain important grades of Group I such as Bright Stock are likely to retain their popularity in the market.
Tenders are invited for lubes for supply of 3000 kl of group i 500n, 1000 kl of group i 150 bright stock and 1000 kl of group i spindle oil n 70 to chennai lube plant
The Yanbu Refinery expansion is intended to increase base oil production to meet future demands for high quality G-II and G-III base oils and increase the GR-I Bright stock to almost double current production; produce higher-value byproducts (naphtha, diesel, kerosene); and satisfy Kingdom requirements for drilling fluid, which is currently imported.
While a shortfall of bright stocks will lead to a price increase for these materials in the short term, suppliers of heavy synthetic basestocks are preparing to fill the bright stock supply gap, and a newly published study by Kline & Company examines the future of the global market for bright stocks and their proposed substitutes.
Global supply of bright stocks -- so named for their bright orange or reddish orange color -- fell by 8% from 1995 to 2005, and as more conventional Group I plants are rationalized, bright stock supply will continue to fall by more than 10% through 2015, according to THE GLOBAL BUSINESS OUTLOOK FOR BRIGHT STOCKS, 2005-2015.
Still, bright stock demand will remain steady in many of the niche applications where they see the most use.
Bright stocks that are high-viscosity base oils are classified under Group I lubricants.