Brine

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brine

1. the sea or its water
2. Chem
a. a concentrated solution of sodium chloride in water
b. any solution of a salt in water
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Brine

 

(1) Highly mineralized natural waters in lagoons, salt lakes, reservoirs, and subterranean waters.

(2) Aqueous sodium chloride solutions used in food preserving.

(3) Aqueous solutions of various salts, for example, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride, that have low freezing points. These solutions act as cold conductors between refrigerators and objects being chilled.

(4) Mixtures composed of two or more solid (or solid and liquid) substances that bring about a decrease in temperature when mixed; this decrease is the result of heat absorption upon melting or dissolving.


Brine

 

the water in lagoons, salt lakes, and reservoirs that is in the form of a saturated solution. The brine found in lakes is grouped according to its chemical composition into carbonate brine, sulfate brine, and chloride brine. The concentration and composition of brines vary, depending on the hydrometeorological conditions during different seasons of the year and over the course of many years. Different chemical processes are constantly taking place in brine and result in a change in its salt composition. Brine is used for baths at pelotherapy resorts either as an independent treatment or together with pelotherapy.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

brine

[brīn]
(materials)
A liquid used in a refrigeration system, usually an aqueous solution of calcium chloride or sodium chloride, which is cooled by contact with the evaporator surface and then goes to the space to be refrigerated.
(oceanography)
Sea water containing a higher concentration of dissolved salt than that of the ordinary ocean.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

brine

In a refrigeration system, any liquid used as a heat transfer medium which remains as a liquid and which has either a flashpoint above 150°F (66°C) or no flashpoint; usually a water solution of inorganic salts.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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