Brine

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brine

1. the sea or its water
2. Chem
a. a concentrated solution of sodium chloride in water
b. any solution of a salt in water

Brine

 

(1) Highly mineralized natural waters in lagoons, salt lakes, reservoirs, and subterranean waters.

(2) Aqueous sodium chloride solutions used in food preserving.

(3) Aqueous solutions of various salts, for example, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride, that have low freezing points. These solutions act as cold conductors between refrigerators and objects being chilled.

(4) Mixtures composed of two or more solid (or solid and liquid) substances that bring about a decrease in temperature when mixed; this decrease is the result of heat absorption upon melting or dissolving.


Brine

 

the water in lagoons, salt lakes, and reservoirs that is in the form of a saturated solution. The brine found in lakes is grouped according to its chemical composition into carbonate brine, sulfate brine, and chloride brine. The concentration and composition of brines vary, depending on the hydrometeorological conditions during different seasons of the year and over the course of many years. Different chemical processes are constantly taking place in brine and result in a change in its salt composition. Brine is used for baths at pelotherapy resorts either as an independent treatment or together with pelotherapy.

brine

[brīn]
(materials)
A liquid used in a refrigeration system, usually an aqueous solution of calcium chloride or sodium chloride, which is cooled by contact with the evaporator surface and then goes to the space to be refrigerated.
(oceanography)
Sea water containing a higher concentration of dissolved salt than that of the ordinary ocean.

brine

In a refrigeration system, any liquid used as a heat transfer medium which remains as a liquid and which has either a flashpoint above 150°F (66°C) or no flashpoint; usually a water solution of inorganic salts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brines on the other hand, may not necessarily be as easily identified, and would not be expected to have a characteristic biota (or any live community whatsoever), yet they may account for pockets of exceptional fossil preservation and/or economically important mineral deposits.
Brines now presents a poetic self who defines his own being by doing.
Brine designers passed sketches of how they wanted the head to look to Fiegener's team.
This is one of numerous salars scattered throughout northern Chile, western Bolivia, and northwestern Argentina in which interstitial brines are rich in sodium, potassium, boron, magnesium, lithium, and even caesium and rubidium, together with chloride and sulphate.
The key to efficient operation, noted Reynolds, is keeping the heavier brines "quiet" so that turbulence between the concentrated brine and lake water is avoided and dilution with the less-concentrated lake water is minimized.
This investigation documented influences of production brines on water quality and fish communities in a Texas coastal stream typical of some Gulf Coast receiving waters.
Meanwhile, meteorite samples and hot brines have yielded some tantalizing evidence of spontaneous fission.
The deepest hole drilled on the northern fringes of the anomaly outlined during the course of an earlier brine sampling program (described in the press release dated May 09, 2011) was 210 feet, and results are pending.
The geophysical exploration program at the CV Project consisted of a Hybrid Source Audio-Magnetotellurics (HSAMT) survey that covered portions of the South Valley, including part of the Companys inferred lithium brine resource, and the North Valley, which has seen very limited exploration.
Sergio later revealed Brines had told him the goal was ruled out on the advice of linesman Tom Murphy.
And a Bairns source close to the boss said last night: "Why did Brines go to the bother of getting his rule book out if he wasn't simply looking for a way of 'getting' Yogi?
The brines from treatments three and four had higher (p<0.