broadcast storm


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broadcast storm

(networking)
A broadcast on a network that causes multiple hosts to respond by broadcasting themselves, causing the storm to grow exponentially in severity.

See network meltdown.

broadcast storm

Excessive transmission of traffic in a network. Broadcast storms can be lessened by properly designing and balancing the number of nodes on each network segment. See mail storm, broadcast traffic, denial-of-service attack and broadcast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the switch provides broadcast storm filtering function, which ensures faster local transmission latency and efficient upstream transmission without data loss and blocking.
Sadekar, "Broadcast storm mitigation techniques in vehicular ad hoc networks," IEEE Wireless Communications, vol.
It avoids the retransmission of already scheduled data packets in order to avoid the broadcast storm. This protocol also employs store-carry-forward mechanisms to deal with network partitions.
In [1], the authors addressed the issue of broadcast operations causing a broadcast storm if forwarding nodes are not carefully designated.
The broadcasting technique is used for route discovery during which the mobile node blindly rebroadcasts the first received route request packets without knowing the route to the destination thus causing broadcast storm problem.
In order to solve the BSP problem, several broadcast storm mitigation protocols for vehicular scenarios have been proposed [12, 16, 19, 20].
[11.] Yu Chee Tseng, Sze Yao Ni, Yuh Shyan Chen ang Jang ping Sheu, "The Broadcast storm problem in Mobile Ad-hoc Network", wireless networks 2002.
The broadcast storm problem in mobile ad hoc networks, Wireless Networks, 8 (2/3) 153-167.
In [6] the authors use a distributed clustering algorithm to create a virtual backbone that allows only some nodes to broadcast messages and thus, to reduce significantly broadcast storms.
Unfortunately, the simple flooding leads to redundancy that will highly congest the network and increases the chances of collision: these combined are known as the broadcast storm problem [24].
These issues can be caused by excessive broadcast traffic sometimes rising to the level of a "broadcast storm" of hundreds of packets per second and, in every case I know of, arise because of erroneous device configuration.
The switches also feature: static routing, VLAN support, RIPv1/2, OSPF, VRRP, flow control, Spanning Tree, broadcast storm control, Jumbo frame support, ACL's, 802.1x, RADIUS, TACACS+, static port security, DNS and LLDP.

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