broadside


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broadside

1. Nautical the entire side of a vessel, from stem to stern and from waterline to rail
2. a ballad or popular song printed on one side of a sheet of paper and sold by hawkers, esp in 16th-century England

broadside

[′brȯd‚sīd]
(electromagnetism)
Perpendicular to an axis or plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Broadside said it will consolidate Framepool's financials from 4Q16.
Or, locate a broadside or map and discuss its connection to a battle.
Damnable Practises: Witches, Dangerous Women, and Music in Seventeenth- Century English Broadside Ballads.
Dangerous Women, and Music in Seventeenth-Century English Broadside Ballads Sarah F.
He walked out around 15 yards, but wouldn't give me a broadside shot.
Publishing company Simon & Schuster is to publish a book by England cricketer Stuart Broad, titled Broadside, literary news company The Bookseller revealed on Tuesday.
For a broadside shot from the ground, I prefer to hit halfway up the body, with the exit wound roughly the same height.
Broadside Ballads From the Pepys Collection: A Selection of Texts, Approaches, and Recordings (CDs included)
Gwendolyn Brooks, Alice Walker, and Nikki Giovanni are among those who owe a debt of gratitude to Randall and his Broadside Press.
Other noteworthy examples from the collection--the majority of which are in Spanish--are an 1844 broadside announcing Thomas O.
Every once in a while, a reader tells me that she got to know me through the pages of Broadside, the monthly feminist magazine published in Toronto between 1978 and 1988.
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art on Thursday announced plans to exhibit rare early American documents, including "one of only 25 known existing copies of the printed broadside version of the Declaration of Independence.