broadside

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broadside

1. Nautical the entire side of a vessel, from stem to stern and from waterline to rail
2. a ballad or popular song printed on one side of a sheet of paper and sold by hawkers, esp in 16th-century England

broadside

[′brȯd‚sīd]
(electromagnetism)
Perpendicular to an axis or plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Broadsides has long been involved with local businesses over the last 25 years including longstanding support from Harveys of Halifax.
Each semester, students in my Black Arts Movement courses create poetry broadsides featuring the work of Nikki Giovanni.
So, there are lessons for today in Charles Dickens' 164-year-old novel, adapted for the stage by Deborah McAndrew and performed with usual gusto by Northern Broadsides.
So there are lessons for today inCharles Dickens' 164-year-old novel, adapted for the stage by Deborah McAndrew and performed with usual gusto byNorthern Broadsides.
The Northern Broadsides show is directed by Rutter, who steps down from the company he founded 25 years ago.
The book describes how the press printed books and broadsides using metal type and traditional tools and discusses the pressAEs work with authors of the rural Kentucky community, such as Wendell Barry, Bobbie Ann Mason, and Maureen Morehead.
The resource is organized into collections focusing on specific areas such as letters, diaries, broadsides, and photographs.
By the seventeenth century, cheap print--ballads and pamphlets like Taylor's--was a major form in which memories of the past were recorded and disseminated: from broadsides listing the kings of England to stories set in an ahistorical 'time of yore'.
She notes that the broadsides examined here "feature stories of witchcraft, husband-murder, and scolding--transgressions that intertwine the fears of female power, musical and acoustic disorder, loquacity, and social imbalance" (4).
Elsewhere we have 'dispelling the myth that broadsides were not enjoyed by the lower classes alone' (p.
In his new book, Picturing the Shakers, Emlen introduces the reader to compelling images of former Shakers used in broadsides and newspaper advertisements to promote Shaker apostate performances.
The category of Judaica broadsides in particular includes an astonishing variety of texts prepared for public or semi-public display: communally promulgated regulations; rabbinic responsa; wall calendars; commercial advertisements; poems and riddles in celebration of weddings and public events; dirges; eulogies; educational charts; fundraising circulars; reports of current events; amulets; announcements; prayers both for daily recitation and for special occasionssome celebratory, others tragicoften with vernacular instructions; and so much more.