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break

[brāk]
(computer science)
To interrupt processing by a computer, usually by depressing a key.
A place in a file of records where one or more of the values in the records change.
(electricity)
A fault in a circuit.
The minimum distance in a circuit-opening device between the stationary and movable contacts when these contacts are in the open position.
(electronics)
A reflected radar pulse which appears on a radarscope as a line perpendicular to the base line.
(geography)
A significant variation of topography, such as a deep valley.
(geology)
(meteorology)
A sudden change in the weather; usually applied to the end of an extended period of unusually hot, cold, wet, or dry weather.
A hole or gap in a layer of clouds.
(mining engineering)
A plane of discontinuity in the coal seam such as a slip, fracture, or cleat; the surfaces are in contact or slightly separated.
A fracture or crack in the roof beds as a result of mining operations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

What does it mean when you dream about a break?

Something physically broken in a dream can refer to non-physical breaks, such as a broken promise, spirit, dream, heart, hope, and the like. But we also have more positive associations with the word, as in “break with the past,” “lucky break,” “break a habit,” “break new ground,” “breakthrough,” etc., any of which might be symbolized by a physical break.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

break

A change in direction of a plane; usually in reference to a wall.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

break

breakclick for a larger image
Ambient air is drawn into the compressor, where it is pressurized—a theoretically isentropic process. The compressed air then runs through a combustion chamber, where fuel is burned, heating that air—a constant-pressure process, since the chamber is open to flow in and out. The heated, pressurized air then gives up its energy, expanding through the a turbine(s)—another theoretically isentropic process. Some of the work extracted by the turbine is used to drive the compressor.
i. A maneuver ordered to a fighter to avoid being shot down. It consists of a maximum rate turn to destroy the hostile aircraft's firing solution.
ii. To “peel off” from formation. The maneuver is normally ordered when the formation comes over the airfield for landing.
iii. The point at which a pilot senses a wing is stalling.
iv. When transmitted on radio, it indicates the separation in messages.
v. To discontinue aerial combat suddenly.
vi. To break a cloud; to make an appearance or come through a cloud.
vii. A break in a cloud; some clear space in other-wise covered sky.
viii. A fault in an electrical system.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

break

(1)
To cause to be broken. "Your latest patch to the editor broke the paragraph commands."

break

(2)
(Of a program) To stop temporarily, so that it may debugged. The place where it stops is a "breakpoint".

break

(3)
To send an EIA-232 break (two character widths of line high) over a serial line.

break

(4)
[Unix] To strike whatever key currently causes the tty driver to send SIGINT to the current process. Normally, break, delete or control-C does this.

break

(5)
"break break" may be said to interrupt a conversation (this is an example of verb doubling). This usage comes from radio communications, which in turn probably came from landline telegraph/teleprinter usage, as badly abused in the Citizen's Band craze.

break

(6)

break

(7)
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

break

(1) To temporarily or permanently stop executing, printing or transmitting.

(2) In cryptography, to decrypt a ciphertext without knowing the key or to find a flaw in an encryption algorithm or implementation that permits such cryptanalysis.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
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Working closely with polymer and alum suppliers, we found that some LMW and HCD coagulants neutralized the broke charge and cleared the broke turbidity, while others did not.
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Police said he broke into Cranston's car and stole the actor's brown shoulder bag which contained an iPad and the script for season five.
Van Valkenburgh and Hertel therefore propose that carnivores from Rancho La Brea broke many teeth because they ate or gnawed on bones more often than their modern counterparts do.
According to this theory, the Indian plate broke because it was plled apart by horizontal forces from the far-off edges of the plate.
They broke the bones so they could remove marrow with a stick, a technique Blumenschine suggests early human ancestors used to scavenge the remains at carnivore kill sites (SN: 3/9/85, p.155).