broken chord

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broken chord

Music a chord played as an arpeggio
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Following a twenty-four measure theme, laid out in binary form, Graziani takes us through four variations, each devoted to a single figure or technique: continuous sixteenth-notes that alternate between scalar and turning movements, double stops, offbeats, and broken chords (notated as "arpegiato").(31)
For Vincent Dance Theatre, she has performed in Caravan of Lies, made and toured Drop Dead Gorgeous, Let The Mountains Lead You To Love, Punch Drunk, Broken Chords and Fairy Tale.
from scraps of broken chords upon their stands.] // repeat
The season kicks off with UK company Vincent Dance Theatre whose Broken Chords (Jan 31) has been inspired by director Charlotte Vincent's own divorce.
Tickets are still available for this event at just pounds 12 and include a glass of wine or soft drink and a top-price ticket for the evening's thrilling performance of Vincent Dance Company's Broken Chords in Stage 1.
Following the critical success of Punch Drunk, Vincent Dance Theatre's new production, Broken Chords, is a dark and humorous look at love and loss by a multi-talented, multi-national ensemble of eight performers.
It sounded like broken chords. When it was completed, Pedro Flores said it was as exciting as tanga, the African word for marijuana.
Although proceeding mainly in four continuous parts, Le Roy follows the contemporary customs of lute arrangements in adding light ornamentation at the cadences and in filling out with broken chords the sustained notes and rests at the end of each poetic line.
Volume I explores typical left-hand accompaniment patterns such as alberti bass, broken chords and solid chords against a right-hand melody.
To die of old age would be to go there on foot." The piano sets up the sound and motion of a train in the introduction and continues this pattern with broken chords in eighths in the left hand under melody or motivic material in the right.
The splendid Kungsbacka Trio certainly entered into the spirit of the piece: pianist Simon Crawford-Phillips mustered a wealth of meaning from his endless broken chords, while violinist Malin Broman and cellist Jesper Svedberg gave expressive depth and breadth to this (let's be honest) shallow music.
Clearly the most virtuoso, but also the simplest of the concertos in terms of expression, is the second Concerto in D major, in which Benda shows a fondness for broken chords (especially in the first movement).