bromoxynil


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bromoxynil

[‚brō′mäk·sə·nil]
(organic chemistry)
C7H3OBr2N A colorless solid with a melting point of 194-195°C; slightly soluble in water; used as a herbicide in wheat, barley, oats, rye, and seeded turf.
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Serial Herbicides % Mortality % Mortality number at rosette at bolted stage stage 1 Glyphosate 96 91 2 Metribuzin 87 75 3 2,4-D 71-80 43 4 Bromoxynil + MCPA 57-79 50-61.
Application of commercial formulations of bromoxynil (emulsion concentrate, and/or suspension concentrate) in the ecosystem may induce species shifts within the communities and could affect the structure and the function of the aquatic communities [6].
2] Can, Eq, Peru, Col, FAO, Nov Mex) Bromacil (314-40-9) 1100 (Can) Bromoxynil (1689-84-5) 11 (Aus/NZ, Can) Cadmium (7440-43-9) 5 (Venezuela); 10 (AS, Aus/NZ, [Bra.
4, 2005) (justifying the risk assessment for the proposed regulation as complying with the requirements demanded by the Codex and OIE); Bromoxynil, Diclofop-methyl, Dicofol, Diquat, Etridiazole, et al.
On April 23, the Commission adopted a Directive for the addition of six active substances to Annex I of Directive 91/414/EEC on the marketing of plant health products (C(2004)1480): alpha-cypermethrin, benalaxyl, bromoxynil, desmedipham, ioxynil and phenmedipham.
These cotton plants are gene-spliced with a soil bacteria called Bt so that the cotton plant emits its own pesticide, or else the plant is genetically engineered to be able to survive mega-doses of powerful toxic pesticides like Monsanto's glyphosate or Aventis' bromoxynil.
CANOLA Herbicide tolerance: Glufosinate ammonium (Oil seed rape) (Basta), and hybrid traits (Liberty) (AgrEvo), Glyphosate (Monsanto), Bromoxynil (Rhone Poulenc) CORN Insect resistance: Bt (Monsanto).
The agency turned down a petition from Rhone Poulenc to extend the use of the herbicide bromoxynil in gene-altered cotton during the 1998 growing season.
Studies show that bromoxynil causes birth defects simply when applied to the skin of pregnant lab animals.
Two of them--a cotton resistant to bromoxynil and soybeans resistant to Monsanto's herbicide glyphosate, better known as Roundup--have already been approved.
Now agricultural gene jockeys report engineering tobacco plants resistant to bromoxynil -- an herbicide that normally kills broad-leaved plants.