carcinoma

(redirected from Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma)
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carcinoma:

see neoplasmneoplasm
or tumor,
tissue composed of cells that grow in an abnormal way. Normal tissue is growth-limited, i.e., cell reproduction is equal to cell death. Feedback controls limit cell division after a certain number of cells have developed, allowing for tissue repair
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carcinoma

[‚kärs·ən′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A malignant epithelial tumor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carcinoma

Pathol
1. any malignant tumour derived from epithelial tissue
2. another name for cancer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and peripheral adenocarcinoma spectrum of diseases.
Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma Mimicking Tuberculosis-A Case Report With Autopsy Findings.
Differential CT features of infectious pneumonia versus bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) mimicking pneumonia.
The tumors historically lumped together as bronchioloalveolar carcinomas are now classified as adenocarcinomas in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinomas, and lepidicpredominant invasive adenocarcinomas.
But now, after decades of beneficial service, the term bronchioloalveolar carcinoma has itself fallen victim to our better understanding of lung cancer.
The classification further subdivides MA depending on the extent of lepidic versus invasive growth pattern into MA in situ, mucinous minimally invasive ACA, or invasive MA (formerly classified as mucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinoma according to the 2004 World Health Organization classification scheme).
(1) Lung adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, previously classified as bronchioloalveolar carcinoma) and invasive adenocarcinoma with mucinous histology have been classically described in the setting of congenital pulmonary airway malformation, primarily in type 1 malformations.
Repeat CT scan after 3 months revealed growth of the lesion, and a transthoracic needle biopsy was performed, from which a diagnosis of nonmucinous adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, formerly bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (2)) was made.
Molecular characteristics of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma subtype, predict response to erlotinib.
These relate to the discontinuation of the terms bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, mixed subtype, as well as the introduction of micropapillary as a new histologic subtype, the term lepidic pattern for the former bronchioloalveolar carcinoma growth pattern, and the specific term invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma for overtly invasive tumors previously classified as mucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.
For example, the term bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) was very confusing as it was used in several different ways in the revised classification (1) to encompass 5 different types of lung adenocarcinoma with dramatically different clinical and pathologic characteristics.