broom finish

broom finish

1. The surface texture obtained by stroking a broom over freshly spread concrete or plaster.
2. See broom, 2.
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To prevent slippage, Morris had the concrete contractors apply a broom finish to the crush pad flooring--a process in which the still-wet concrete is wiped with a broom to create a subtle ridge texture.
Tenders are invited for work includes erosion control, demolition, 240 sf of existing trail demolition, excavation and grading, remove, store, and reinstall existing street light, retaining walls, 2 ea of accessible ramp, 38 lf of curb & gutter, 4060 sf of 6 reinforced concrete trail & flatwork with medium broom finish finish including rumble strips, see attached file.
"A broom finish is the least expensive, and some types of stone, like granite, can be very expensive," he says.
Also, you'll notice a very heavy "broom finish" on the surface is angled.
To apply a nonslip texture, lightly drag a clean push broom in one direction across the still-wet material (allow no more than five minutes of setting time before applying the broom finish).
"The broom finish is to give the surface a visual impact as well as provide a rougher texture for wintertime conditions."
* Broom finish. A stiff-bristled shop broom texture provides an excellent nonslip surface.
The slab should have a relatively smooth finish, rather than a deep broom finish. A smooth finish is easier to keep clean, and Thiessen has found mortar adheres to it just as well as a broom finish.
The standard driveway is composed of the gravel bed, a single pour of concrete at least 4 inches deep, 1-inch-deep expansion joints spaced 8 to 12 feet apart, and a broom finish; it costs about $2 to $3 per square foot.
The "broom finish" on walks and patios creates a very rough surface which not only provides a, safety feature but also an attractive design.
surface shall be sweat finished with a steel trowel or with a power trowel and finished with a light broom finish. finished floor shall be flat to within a 1/4" tolerance when measured with a 10~ straight edge.
For a decorative border effect similar to what's shown in the inset to Photo 4, run the edger around each section of slab after a final broom finish.