broom finish

broom finish

1. The surface texture obtained by stroking a broom over freshly spread concrete or plaster.
2. See broom, 2.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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To prevent slippage, Morris had the concrete contractors apply a broom finish to the crush pad flooring--a process in which the still-wet concrete is wiped with a broom to create a subtle ridge texture.
"A broom finish is the least expensive, and some types of stone, like granite, can be very expensive," he says.
Also, you'll notice a very heavy "broom finish" on the surface is angled.
To apply a nonslip texture, lightly drag a clean push broom in one direction across the still-wet material (allow no more than five minutes of setting time before applying the broom finish).
"The broom finish is to give the surface a visual impact as well as provide a rougher texture for wintertime conditions."
* Broom finish. A stiff-bristled shop broom texture provides an excellent nonslip surface.
The slab should have a relatively smooth finish, rather than a deep broom finish. A smooth finish is easier to keep clean, and Thiessen has found mortar adheres to it just as well as a broom finish.
The standard driveway is composed of the gravel bed, a single pour of concrete at least 4 inches deep, 1-inch-deep expansion joints spaced 8 to 12 feet apart, and a broom finish; it costs about $2 to $3 per square foot.
The "broom finish" on walks and patios creates a very rough surface which not only provides a, safety feature but also an attractive design.
For a decorative border effect similar to what's shown in the inset to Photo 4, run the edger around each section of slab after a final broom finish.