heel

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Related to brought to heel: touch base, fall through, at least, up to par

heel

1
1. the back part of the human foot from the instep to the lower part of the ankle
2. the corresponding part in other vertebrates
3. Horticulture the small part of the parent plant that remains attached to a young shoot cut for propagation and that ensures more successful rooting
4. Nautical
a. the bottom of a mast
b. the after end of a ship's keel
5. the back part of a golf club head where it bends to join the shaft
6. Rugby possession of the ball as obtained from a scrum (esp in the phrase get the heel)

heel

2
inclined position from the vertical

Heel

The lower end of an upright member, especially one resting on a support.

What does it mean when you dream about a heel?

The heel is often used synonymously for the foot as a symbol, for example, to represent violence or oppression (e.g., under the heel of a dictator). As the part of the body most often in contact with the ground and dirt, it can be a symbol of the base or ignoble, for instance, a low, vile, contemptible, despicable person (a “heel”). The heel is also often represented by the analogous part of a shoe, which is frequently in shabby condition (“down at the heels”), perhaps signifying something in the dreamer’s life that needs attention. Finally, the heel can also represent vulnerability, as in an Achilles’ heel.

heel

[hēl]
(mechanical engineering)
(metallurgy)
A quantity of molten metal remaining in the ladle after pouring a metal cast-ing.
A quantity of metal retained in an induction furnace during a stand-by period.
(navigation)
Of a ship, to incline or to be inclined to one side.
(ordnance)
Upper corner of the butt of a rifle stock held in firing position.

heel

1. The lower end of an upright timber, esp. one resting on a support.
2. The lower end of the hanging stile of a door.
3. The floor brace for timbers that brace a wall.
4. The trailing edge of the blade of a bulldozer, or the like.
References in periodicals archive ?
With EI brought to heel, the juveniles arrived from Australia three weeks ago.
A repeat of the drudgery produced against Italy on Saturday will see Ireland brought to heel in Paris and Trimble knows a clinical display will be needed to spring an upset.
The mildly erring husband and truculent daughter are suitably brought to heel and end re-besotted by the beautiful, intelligent and artistic Grace.
From 1942 till the end, Hitler and the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht were to learn just how serious Harris and his American counterparts were in bringing death and destruction to the Third Reich as part of extirpating an evil regime that could not be brought to heel by anything but total defeat.
David Moffett has warned all the Welsh regions to expect to be brought to heel if they compromise the future of Welsh rugby.
MIDLAND yobs are being brought to heel - by giving them stray dogs to look after.
And he has brought to heel peevish local executives who were locking horns with current Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick.
When Europe and America work together, there is no difficulty that cannot be overcome, no challenge that cannot be brought to heel. We do not always agree on particulars.
He thought we were uppity women who had to be brought to heel.
Addressing a Tel Aviv court in Hebrew, he said the uprising had taught the Israelis that "the Palestinian people cannot be brought to heel by force."
Cast works together like a well-oiled stock company, with Katsuhisa Namase a stand-out as the father, skirting the edges of foolish enthusiasm for his pet project but brought to heel by his inner loss, which he finally manages to express.
But as street looters were brought to heel it became clear that others, with claims they too were anxious to stake, might not be so easily disuaded.