Brownfield

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greenfield

A brand new installation of hardware or software without having to integrate new elements into existing ones. Contrast with "brownfield," which is an upgrade to the current system. Greenfield and brownfield are building industry terms that refer to clean, undeveloped land (green) versus contaminated land or land with existing structures (brown). The terms may refer to network installations as well. See green, greenware and greenwashing.
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Brownfield

The designation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for existing facilities or sites that are abandoned, idled, or otherwise underused real property where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination that needs to be cleaned up before the site can be used again. Examples are former dry-cleaning establishments and gas stations. The use of brownfields typically reduces land cost by using land that is less desirable. However, lower land costs must be balanced against the cost of any required remediation and possible health risks to residents. The EPA sponsors an initiative to help mitigate these health risks and return the facility or land to renewed use. Many green guidelines and standards provide points for building in brownfield areas.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(55) In the case of brownfields, both the United Kingdom and the United
United States Response to Brownfields and Their Development
"By awarding grants to those committed to cleaning up and developing brownfield sites, we can start revitalizations that may not otherwise have occurred, and that will bring real benefits to local neighborhoods."
Deputy Mayor for Operations Stephen Goldsmith launched the Office of Environmental Remediation's Brownfield Incentive Grant (BIG) Program in a speech at the New York City Brownfield Partnership's annual Big Apple Brownfield Award Ceremony held at the New York University Law School.
A spatial join with previously redeveloped brownfields was used to determine distances to features, such as highway exits, to use for control points.
The suitability scores for previously redeveloped brownfields were compared to the scores of existing brownfields to understand how the different objectives were met by the revitalized properties.
It also allows the Environmental Protection Agency to reserve as much as $1.5 million in brownfield funding each year to assist small communities, tribes, and rural or disadvantaged areas.
Revitalizing brownfields will make communities in Duluth safer and healthier, as well as create jobs, proponents of the Brownfield Health Indicator Tool said.
Brownfields are less heavily contaminated than sites on the EPA's (https://theconversation.com/cutting-superfunds-budget-will-slow-toxic-waste-cleanups-threatening-public-health-and-property-values-74787) Superfund list , which can take decades to clean up.
This article focuses on the issues of brownfields in the urban spaces of post-socialist Central Europe by contrasting two big cities of the Czech Republic with their distinct historical and industrial development.