brown

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brown

1. any of various colours, such as those of wood or earth, produced by low intensity light in the wavelength range 620--585 nanometres
2. brown cloth or clothing
3. any of numerous mostly reddish-brown butterflies of the genera Maniola, Lasiommata, etc., such as M. jurtina (meadow brown): family Satyridae
4. of the colour brown

Brown

1. Sir Arthur Whitten . 1886--1948, British aviator who with J W Alcock made the first flight across the Atlantic (1919)
2. Ford Madox. 1821--93, British painter, associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. His paintings include The Last of England (1865) and Work (1865)
3. George (Alfred), Lord George-Brown. 1914--85, British Labour politician; vice-chairman and deputy leader of the Labour party (1960--70); foreign secretary 1966--68
4. George Mackay. 1921--96, Scottish poet, novelist, and short-story writer. His works, which include the novels Greenvoe (1972) and Magnus (1973), reflect the history and culture of Orkney
5. (James) Gordon. born 1951, British Labour politician; Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1997
6. Herbert Charles. born 1912, US chemist, who worked on the compounds of boron. Nobel prize for chemistry 1979
7. James. born 1933, US soul singer and songwriter, noted for his dynamic stage performances and for his commitment to Black rights
8. John. 1800--59, US abolitionist leader, hanged after leading an unsuccessful rebellion of slaves at Harper's Ferry, Virginia
9. Lancelot, called Capability Brown. 1716--83, British landscape gardener
10. Michael (Stuart). born 1941, US physician: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1985) for work on cholesterol
11. Robert. 1773--1858, Scottish botanist who was the first to observe the Brownian movement in fluids

brown

symbol of unfruitfulness. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]

Brown

(dreams)
Brown is not the most cheerful color in the spectrum. It is a very serious color that is associated with the earth, dirt, or soil. Autumn is generally brown and it represents a season of dormancy and conservatism. The brown in your dream may be symbolic of physical reality and earthiness. It may represent things in their “barest” form, and its interpretation may encourage you to add some light and depth into your daily life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spinach leaves and bags were selected using guidelines suggested by experts in food safety and in the industry: leaves with excessive brownness were avoided, as were bags with excessive water in them.
Brown: The Last Discovery of America (2002) is Rodriguez's extended discussion of brownness, impurity, and desire as fully materialized in race--or, more specifically, skin colour.
Throughout the novel, Oscar is obsessed with his skin color and weight: he grows up a fat, dark Mexican; his description stresses his Indian features such as his nose, the brownness of his skin, and his "large peasant hands" (Acosta 1989, 11), representing himself as an urban pelado (Octavio Paz's Mexican peasant): "I'm an innocent brown-eyed child of the sun," Oscar declares (54).
The implication is that somehow I am different from the rest of the Muslims, that they are all immoderate fanatics, and that I, in my sweet brownness, have somehow met the level of acceptability.
Feel free to make the roux at a leisurly pace, slowly stirring it to the desired brownness while reading something appropriate and southern from "American Food Writing.
He was brown all over and his hair, down there, was only a sort of intensification of that brownness.
She flashes a huge grin when reference is made to her blonde hair, which has recently returned after a spell of brownness, for her new role as police station receptionist Kate Keenan in Holby Blue.
Lay them on baking sheets and roast in oven until desired brownness (approx.
It houses, in whatever terms you prefer, the knower and the thing known, the subject and the object of attention, the thought-of-an-object and the object-thought-of: "If you ask what any one bit of pure experience is made of, the answer is always the same: 'It is made of that, of just what appears, of space, of intensity, of flatness, brownness, heaviness, or what not.
I asked, in the middle of a billion acres of brownness.
Since the hills are both brown and green, one might align Ran with the green color of the hills, as a fertility god, while Eugene represents the childless brownness of the peaks.