brownstone

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brownstone,

red to brown variety of sandstonesandstone,
sedimentary rock formed by the cementing together of grains of sand. The usual cementing material in sandstone is calcium carbonate, iron oxides, or silica, and the hardness of sandstone varies according to the character of the cementing material; quartz sandstones
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. Its unusual color is caused in some instances by the presence of red iron oxide which acts as a cement, binding the sand grains together. Vast thicknesses (up to 20,000 ft/6,096 m) of brownstone were deposited in the present-day Connecticut River Valley of Massachusetts and Connecticut and in central New Jersey during the latter part of the Triassic periodTriassic period
, first period of the Mesozoic era of geologic time (see Geologic Timescale, table) from 205 to 250 million years ago.

Throughout the Triassic, E North America, as a result of the mountain-building episode that formed the Appalachians in the late Paleozoic
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. Quarries in these regions were the source for much of the building stone used in the late 19th and early 20th cent. in the construction of the many brownstone houses found from Baltimore to Boston; the stone, however, is not very durable, especially if poorly laid or maintained. Similar, but more brightly colored, sandstones also were deposited in the Rocky Mt. region during the Triassic period and Jurassic periodJurassic period
[from the Jura Mts.], second period of the Mesozoic era of geologic time, lasting from 213 to 144 million years ago. At the start of the Jurassic most of the continents were joined together until the Atlantic began to form and the Americas split off from Africa.
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. These deposits are called "redbeds" and make up the colorful landscapes of the Painted Desert of Arizona.

brownstone

A dark brown or reddish-brown sandstone, used extensively for building in the United States during the middle and late 19th century. See also: Stone

brownstone

[′brau̇n‚stōn]
(petrology)
Ferruginous sandstone with its grains coated with iron oxide.

brownstone

1. A dark brown or reddish brown arkosic sandstone, quarried and used extensively for building in the eastern US during the middle and late nineteenth cent.
2. A dwelling faced with brownstone, often a row house.
References in periodicals archive ?
Solomon's space-planning expertise transformed the first floor of the brownstone into a hip paint studio, complete with exposed brick walls and natural lighting.
One of the most innovative aspects of the site, as well as the community, is the "Design Your Own Brownstone" feature which encourages users to build their dream home for sale in Georgetown Ttexas.
"The Brownstone product has been modelled to encourage buyers and tenants to stay.
In the Tustin, Calif., community of Tustin Field, the 58 contemporary brownstones known as Wright's Landing serve as a landmark.
That same brownstone downtown on Waverly [Street] is $4 million or $5 million." Wright pays $2,800 for 4,000 square feet of office space in Harlem.
In most of their books, most notably Brown Girl, Brownstones and Annie John, political conflicts between the motherland and mother country are exposed in the many conflicts between mothers and daughters.
Knowing her experience with the Upper West Side Brownstones, Gross-Ginsburg was asked to help manage Gordon's two office buildings, something that was new to her skillset.
"Currently, brownstones seem to be [a] relative anomaly in the market," Miller said, adding: "It's a form of housing stock that's limited in availability and, for the moment, has been relatively unscathed" by the housing slump afflicting the rest of the city.
Chapter four on African American Female Initiation novels looks at Gwendolyn Brooks's Maude Martha, Paule Marshall's Brown Girl, Brownstones, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, and ntozake shange's Sassafrass, Cypress, and Indigo.
The property is situated in Brooklyn's Fort Greene neighborhood, known for its tree-lined residential streets and brownstones, as well as a vibrant retail and entertainment scene.
Two years ago, Time Out New York named a stretch of South Portland Avenue in Fort Greene the "best block" in New York, noting that its brownstones gave it a "Sesame Street" feel -- and that it's nestled in a neighborhood known for a "commingling of cultures" where "there's plenty to do."
Harlem brownstones and barber shops are fodder for exploration as Collier's collage illustrations create a truly wonderful sense of adventure through visual observation.

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