browse

(redirected from browsed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.

browse

the young twigs, shoots, leaves, etc., on which certain animals feed

browse

[brau̇z]
(biology)
Twigs, shoots, and leaves eaten by livestock and other grazing animals.
To feed on this vegetation.
(computer science)
Any method for looking at information stored in a computer in a random manner, usually using a cathode-ray tube or other electronic display.
(graphic arts)
Rapid examination by means of a reader screen of the individual frames of a multi-image microform; used in searching for or processing a specific image.

browse

(1) On the Web, browse means to move from link to link to view the contents of Web pages. See Web browser.

(2) To view the contents of a file. See file viewer and graphics viewer.

(3) To view the file hierarchy on a disk. Browse is a primary function of a file manager, letting users peruse the files by name that are on the computer's drives. The browse function is also built into every Open and Save operation in an application. It allows the user to locate a file in order to open it and to select a folder in which to save a newly created file. See file manager.

(4) To view and edit a flow chart of a system created in a program specialized for visual system design.

(5) To view and edit a class hierarchy of objects in an object-oriented programming language. See object-oriented programming.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trace amounts of white spruce have been recorded in winter moose diets in Maine (Ludewig and Bowyer 1985) and on Isle Royale even though it had sufficient nutritional quality to be heavily browsed (Belovsky 1981).
Constructing dry weight-diameter curves for browsed twigs.
Birches whose shoots were previously browsed by moose have a higher probability of being browsed again than unbrowsed or slightly browsed birches because of the higher leaf and stem chemical quality, large long shoots, and greater proportion of shoots within reach of moose (Bergstrom 1984, Danell and Huss-Danell 1985, Danell et al.
Thus, leaf stripping in summer results in a negative feedback between moose and the browsed plant while winter browsing on shoots gives positive feedbacks.
In pines, the delay in compensatory response may temporarily release browsed pines from subsequent browsing, allowing some recovery (Edenius et al.
Balsam fir is also repeatedly browsed by moose, leading to a highly pruned growth form (Brandner et al.
Use of balsam fir ranged from 16 to 34% of the total browsed twigs in 1977 and ranged from 73.
Use of balsam fir ranged from 0 to 24% of the total browsed twigs in 1977 and ranged from 87.
The pooled mean density of browsed twigs (all sites) increased significantly from 1977 to 1996 (P = 0.