Brucella

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Related to brucellae: Brucella melitensis

Brucella

[brü′sel·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria of uncertain affiliation; single, nonmotile coccobacilli or short rods, all of which are parasites and pathogens of mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because we found persistence of attenuated brucellae in the spleens of some male CD8 knockout mice at the time point at which others were subsequently challenged, it must be acknowledged that the apparent protection may be due in part to persistent macrophage activation.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/), the sequence was 100% identical to the sequences of 16S rDNA of brucellae, especially reference strains including B.
Because brucellae are often transmitted by direct contact or exposure to a contaminated environment, it is possible that rather than being a natural reservoir for the bacteria, takins are infected horizontally by contact with birth exudates from other infected animals (2).
To further understand the interaction of brucellae among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans, and for purposes of brucellosis management and control, systematic investigations of brucellosis prevalence among wildlife should be conducted.
Several biologic characteristics make brucellae easily transmissible within the close confinement of the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the facts that the infecting dose for humans is low, and the organism may enter the body in many ways relevant to laboratory practices (e.g., through the respiratory mucosa, conjunctivae, gastrointestinal tract, or abraded skin) (1,2).
Soon after entry into the body through the skin or mucous membranes, brucellae are ingested by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes.
Therefore, serologic tests that use suspensions of smooth brucellae are not useful in diagnosing B.
Conventional tests for antibodies to smooth brucellae (agglutination, complement fixation) yielded negative results.
Person-to-person transmission of brucellae is extremely rare (2,4), and human infection may be an accidental expression of a more widespread problem in animals (5).
Persons usually become infected with brucellae through direct contact with infected animals or their products.