brushwood


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brushwood

1. cut or broken-off tree branches, twigs, etc
2. another word for brush
References in classic literature ?
Once a dark, clumsy tapir stared at us from a gap in the bushes, and then lumbered away through the forest; once, too, the yellow, sinuous form of a great puma whisked amid the brushwood, and its green, baleful eyes glared hatred at us over its tawny shoulder.
Finally we pulled the boats up among the brushwood and spent the night on the bank of the river.
The huge trees of the alluvial Amazonian plain gave place to the Phoenix and coco palms, growing in scattered clumps, with thick brushwood between.
But there was no isolated bush, nor modest brushwood, at the bottom of lofty trees.
Soldiers scattered over the whole place were dragging logs and brushwood and were building shelters with merry chatter and laughter; around the fires sat others, dressed and undressed, drying their shirts and leg bands or mending boots or overcoats and crowding round the boilers and porridge cookers.
She had no sooner moved on again, than she was conscious of the same sound, which was like that of a person tramping stealthily among bushes and brushwood. Looking towards the spot whence it appeared to come, she almost fancied she could make out a crouching figure.
Complete execution of related works - logging, skidding, wood handling and its removal and cleaning of brushwood after logging
Byline: Brushwood Center at Ryerson Woods submission
An artist has created a life-sized mammoth out of brushwood as part of the Bishop's Castle elephant trail.
Measures such as installing bundles of brushwood to stabilise stream banks and slopes, planting trees and creating 'leaky dams' to slow water flow will be used along the Colne and Calder river catchments.
Willow stakes with bundles of brushwood were placed in between, then meshed sacks of rock were laid in place to stabilise the edge of the watercourse and encourage wild life.
Carrying enormous loads of brushwood, bulls were frequently encountered in the streets of Seoul and were, for the most part, gentle giants (even children could safely manage them) until frightened by something foreign ?