bubble pulse

bubble pulse

[′bəb·əl ‚pəls]
(geophysics)
An extraneous effect during a seismic survey caused by a bubble formed by a seismic charge, explosion, or spark fired in a body of water.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike contact explosion, noncontact explosion does not break ship's hull, but shock wave and bubble pulse usually cause great impact to ship and result in the permanent deformation of hull plate, breakdown of onboard equipment and casualty of personnel.
The bubble pulse pressure peak is 15.5% of the shock wave peak.
Considering the broad profile characteristics of bubble pulse, no comparison of their peaks is made.
An abrupt jump of signal indicates that the target responds to the arrival of shock wave and bubble pulse. Moreover, there exist fewer high frequency components in the coated models' records, which will be verified by later spectra analysis.
As the secondary shock waves have much smaller peaks and are usually much less damaging than the primary shock wave, the peaks caused by the bubble pulse are not given.
The acceleration responses of inner structures to both shockwave and bubble pulse can be greatly lowered, especially for the shock wave.
When a naval ship is attacked by an underwater explosion (UNDEX), the ship can be severely damaged by shock waves and gas bubble pulse. Predicting the shock response of ships to noncontact UNDEX from underwater weapon is of great importance for the warhead design of underwater weapon.
The submerged or floating structure within the vicinity of an UNDEX will be subjected to loading from both the shockwave and the bubble pulse pressure waves and its performance according to the strength of these waves and the resilience of the structure.
Underwater explosions send out a distinctive pattern of pressure waves known as a bubble pulse, which stems from oscillations in the rising bubble of hot gases Because water is a nearly incompressible fluid, the pressure pulses from even small underwater blasts can generate strong seismic signals when they strike the lake or ocean bottom.
Also, he contends, simple collisions wouldn't create a bubble pulse.
The seismic data captured by the European instruments include two bubble pulses. Only a few seismometers captured the first blast, which the scientists estimate released energy equivalent to 250 kilograms of TNT--about the energy of a modern torpedo, Wallace notes.