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bucket

1. any of various bucket-like parts of a machine, such as the scoop on a mechanical shovel
2. a cupped blade or bucket-like compartment on the outer circumference of a water wheel, paddle wheel, etc
3. Computing a unit of storage on a direct-access device from which data can be retrieved
4. Chiefly US a turbine rotor blade
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bucket

 

(in Russian, kovsh), in mining and construction machinery, a device for gripping and removing a portion of the earth (rock, material, and so on) from the matrix and moving it to the unloading area. The bucket should cut easily into the material being worked (for this the bucket may have a cutting edge, usually with teeth), and it should be sufficiently strong and durable. In addition, it should be easily filled and emptied. The buckets are attached to chains (chain-and-bucket excavators and loaders, bucket dredges, and drags), a rotor (rotary excavators), arms (power shovels and loaders), or a bucket frame or are suspended from a bearing structure of draglines and clamshells by chains and cables. The force necessary for cutting or digging up the material being worked is imparted to the buckets through these devices. The buckets may be cast, welded, or stamped. The buckets are usually unloaded on the side of the cutting edge or by opening the bottom, less frequently by forcing the earth out with a special scraper or a movable rear wall.

The bucket capacity of a mechanical shovel ranges from 0.15 to 200 eu m; for chain bucket excavators, 0.007 to 7 cu m; for single-bucket loaders, 0.07 to 30 cu m; for multibucket loaders, 0.005 to 0.1 cu m; for scrapers, 0.75 to 60 cu m; and for dredges, 0.05 to 1 cu m. Multibucket loaders, excavators, and dredges usually have 12 to 50 buckets; rotary excavators, six to 18.

The rotor blades of a bucket hydraulic turbine may also be called buckets. Elevators and conveyers may also be equipped with monorail buckets.


Bucket

 

the working element (scoop) of a scraper unit equipped with a cableway, used in excavating, transporting, and similar operations above the ground, underground, and underwater. The bucket is moved by a winch with a block and tackle.

REFERENCES

Dombrovskii, N. G. and M. I. Gal’perin. Zemleroino-transportnye mashiny. Moscow, 1965.
See also references under EXCAVATING MACHINES.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bucket

[′bək·ət]
(botany)
(computer science)
A name usually reserved for a storage cell in which data may be accumulated.
(engineering)
A cup on the rim of a Pelton wheel against which water impinges.
A reversed curve at the toe of a spillway to deflect the water horizontally and reduce erosiveness.
A container on a lift pump or chain pump.
A container on some bulk-handling equipment, such as a bucket elevator, bucket dredge, or bucket conveyor.
A water outlet in a turbine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bucket

An attachment for a materials-handling or excavating machine that digs or carries loose materials such as earth, gravel, stone, or concrete; may be shaped like a scoop, with provision for opening and closing for convenience in unloading.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bucket

(1) A reserved amount of memory that holds a single item or multiple items of data. Bucket is somewhat synonymous to "buffer," although buffers are usually memory locations for incoming data records, while buckets tend to be smaller holding areas for calculations. See hash table, buffer and variable.

(2) A customer-defined storage area in a cloud-based storage system such as Amazon's S3 or Google Storage. Each bucket can be divided into folders. Customers are not charged for the buckets themselves, only when data reside within them. See S3 cloud storage and Google Storage.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
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