budbreak


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budbreak

[′bəd‚brāk]
(botany)
Initiation of growth from a bud.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our preliminary survey of UCCE perennial crop experts suggests that pears, wine grapes and some rootstocks of various Prunus species (i.e., almond, peaches and plums) are best suited for groundwater banking if planted on suitable soils and managed appropriately, especially after budbreak. While extensive in acreage, almonds may be less ideal because of the trees' sensitivity to saturated conditions and high nitrogen demand (table 1).
About eight weeks after budbreak, they begin to bloom.
Zelleke, A., and Kliewer, W.M., 1979, Influence of root temperature and rootstock on budbreak, shoot growth, and fruit composition of Cabemet Sauvignon grapevines grown under controlled conditions: American Journal of Enology and Viticulture, v.
High soil moisture will keep the root zone cool so in a wet year budbreak will be delayed more than in a dry year.
In 27-yr-old black alder and Scots pine plantations the short-root sampling was carried out before budbreak (April), in mid-summer (June-July), and after fall (November) 2004.
Hydrogen cyanamide * is used in agriculture as a plant growth regulator and is applied to many deciduous plants to stimulate uniform budbreak after dormancy, resulting in uniform flowering and maturity.
Viburnum ashei vegetative buds require 400 to 700 hours of chilling for budbreak. Maximum vegetative growth for Climax occurred after 450 hours of chilling below 7.2[degrees]C of Bluebelle and Delite after 500 hours; and of Tifblue after 650 hours.
First budswell, then budbreak, then the first green shoots, then tiny leaf clusters, then pre-bloom.
Other cultivar/rootstock evaluations in northern Mississippi have reported shoot growth, budbreak, leaf area, and yield of grafted trees (Siswanto, 1994 and 2000; Fandi, 1997; and Rauf, 1998).