Buffoonery

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Buffoonery

 

an acting technique that is usually found in comedies. It is characterized by the performer’s striving to maximally emphasize the external distinctive features of the character and by extreme exaggeration. Buffoonery developed in the popular open-air theaters of mimes and minstrels-cum-clowns. It was used in the Italian commediadell’arte and penetrated into the dramaturgy of J. B. Molière, C. Goldoni, A. V. Sukhovo-Kobylin, V. V. Mayakovsky, and other writers. la. D. Shumskii, A. G. Ozhogin, and V. I. Zhivokini were masters of buffoonery in the Russian prerevolutionary theater. Soviet masters include G. M. Iaron and V. Ia. Khenkin. Buffoonery is particularly popular in the circus.

References in periodicals archive ?
On Mr Johnson working with President Trump, Ms Maiden added: "Two buffoons to-gether, it will be like a zoo, I dread to think what will happen."
Now because he, David, has held office as Privy Counsellor he bears the mode of address of Right Honourable and guess who else does, yes you've got it, Buffoon Boris -the man who calls Moslem women dressed in a burka as letter boxes and has scant regard for the comfort and privacy of his housing neighbours by having a row with his partner to the extent that the neighbour was able to record it.
I ran into her the next morning, she glared at me and snapped, 'I don't like your buffoon, how does your mother allow you out with that thing?
I'm mindful I'm going magnificent then look buffoon got no "So I'm tempering that enthusiasm with a little bit of realism but I am hopeful, like I've said before, that we can add two or three players in positions where we feel we need a little bit more.
Here, some people used to dismiss Tory Boris Johnson as a buffoon whose primary purpose in life was to be laughed at when he appeared on Have I Got News For You?
Bonneville's Head of Deliverance Ian Fletcher ponders the results of a study which suggests making the diving pool shallower, all the while continuing his unenviable struggle to stay afloat in a sea of buffoons.
"London is a world-class city, the last thing we need is a world-class buffoon as a Tory candidate for mayor," she said.
I believe that the professor can play the role of the buffoon and the director when teaching literature to engage students in class and help them discuss and write about literature in a more pleasant and enjoyable way.
Buffoon, an ungainly, unpromising horse, is sent there to be trained, and Tessa is drawn to him so deeply that the experience for both of them is almost mystical.
In this case he makes his appearance in the guise of Rush Donald, Logan's haughty, buffoon of a boss.
Hanging to the left along the gallery wall beyond Manet's Christ were Velazquez's Bacchus, 1628-29; The Forge of Vulcan, 1630; The Dwarf Francisco Lezcano 1643-45; and The Buffoon Pablo de Valladolid, 1636-37, known in Manet's day as The Tragic Actor.