bugbear


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bugbear

(in English folklore) a goblin said to eat naughty children and thought to be in the form of a bear
References in classic literature ?
all I understood by being a gentlewoman was to be able to work for myself, and get enough to keep me without that terrible bugbear going to service, whereas they meant to live great, rich and high, and I know not what.
I understand that Mazarin is at this very moment extremely uneasy as to the state of affairs; that his orders are not respected like those of our former bugbear, the deceased cardinal, whose portrait as you see hangs yonder -- for whatever may be thought of him, it must be allowed that Richelieu was great."
I used to feel that keenly as a boy, when, by a prophetic irony, burglars were my bugbear, and I looked under my bed every night in life.
Fear creates bugbears. At this crisis Baudoyer firmly believed in the said Chapter, little aware that the only Jesuits who had put him where he now was sat by his own fireside, and in the Cafe Themis playing dominoes.
You have grown up from infancy in the fear of this monster, and therefore still regard him with the awe that children feel for the bugbears and hobgoblins which their nurses have talked to them about.
That will keep a frictionless border between north and south in Ireland - the biggest bugbear of the talks.
In medieval England, the Bugbear was depicted as a creepy bear that lurked in the woods.
The member for Marple North told the meeting: "Feet on seats is a real bugbear for me.
I refuse to believe that I am the only person wound up by a particular phrase, although I am happy to accept that I am uniquely troubled by "same" and "difference." I know that you, gentle reader, will have your own bugbear phrases.
48% of British travellers say lack of cleanliness is their greatest bugbear when staying at a hotel;.
But his biggest bugbear was leaving a meal unfinished and being asked if he wanted it "to go".