buggy


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buggy

1. a light horse-drawn carriage having either four wheels (esp in the US and Canada) or two wheels (esp in Britain and India)
2. a small motorized vehicle designed for a particular purpose

buggy

[′bəg·ē]
(engineering)
(mining engineering)
A four-wheeled steel car used for hauling coal to and from chutes.

buggy, concrete cart

A two-wheeled or four-wheeled cart, often motor-driven, usually rubber-tired, for transporting small quantities of concrete from hoppers or mixers to forms.

buggy

Software that contains flaws. Many in the software industry swear that bugs are inevitable, and perhaps they are right. As long as we work in the competitive, pressure-cooker environment of our high-tech world, products will more often than not be developed too hastily and released too early. See bug and bugrade.
References in classic literature ?
At the moment Ethan Frome, after climbing to his seat, had leaned over to assure himself of the security of a wooden box-also with a druggist's label on it-which he had placed in the back of the buggy, and I saw his face as it probably looked when he thought himself alone.
We sit in the cushioned carriage-body of a cabin, with the curtains drawn, and smoke, or read, or look out upon the passing boats, the houses, the bridges, the people, and enjoy ourselves much more than we could in a buggy jolting over our cobble-stone pavements at home.
Jumping out of the buggy he put Dorothy's suit-case under the seat and her bird-cage on the floor in front.
Then he got into the buggy again and took the reins, and the horse at once backed away from the tree, turned slowly around, and began to trot down the sandy road which was just visible in the dim light.
Then he started to say something to his little companion, but before he could speak the buggy began to sway dangerously from side to side and the earth seemed to rise up before them.
With a wild neigh of terror the animal fell bodily into the pit, drawing the buggy and its occupants after him.
Dorothy grabbed fast hold of the buggy top and the boy did the same.
Matthew, dressed up with a white collar and driving in a buggy, was something that didn't happen often.
He doesn't generally go to town this time of year and he NEVER visits; if he'd run out of turnip seed he wouldn't dress up and take the buggy to go for more; he wasn't driving fast enough to be going for a doctor.
We waved wildly back until the buggy had driven around the curve.
Gilbert lifted Anne from the buggy and led her into the garden, through the little gate between the ruddy-tipped firs, up the trim, red path to the sandstone step.
Promptly at twenty minutes to four the next afternoon Timothy and Nancy drove off in the open buggy to meet the expected guest.