bugle

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bugle,

brass wind musical instrument consisting of a conical tube coiled once upon itself, capable of producing five or six harmonics. It is usually in G or B flat. Its principal use is for military and naval bugle calls, such as taps and reveille, and, in earlier times, for hunting calls. In the early 19th cent., keyed bugles were made in order to obtain a complete scale.

reducer

reducer, 2
1. A thinner or solvent; used to lower the viscosity of a paint, varnish, or lacquer.

bugle

1
Music a brass instrument similar to the cornet but usually without valves: used for military fanfares, signal calls, etc.

bugle

2. any of several Eurasian plants of the genus Ajuga, esp A. reptans, having small blue or white flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates)

bugle

3
a tubular glass or plastic bead sewn onto clothes for decoration
References in periodicals archive ?
After working within bow range of a couple immature bulls, we were literally down to 15 minutes of legal shooting time when we heard one last bugle. Honestly, it sounded nothing like a mature bull to me, but as we listened to the squeaky bugle cut through the cool mountain air, we had no other option.
Separated by 40 yards of elk timber, Vince and I were screaming at each other through our bugle tubes.
In fact, it's more of a rewind, according to Gary: "We looked at old Bugles to see how we had changed over the years, to see if there were ideas we could bring back.
The event will also feature the Chester-le-Street based Band and Bugles of Durham Army Cadet Force, and the Pipes and Drums of 102 Battalion REME.
Use cow elk sounds far more than elk bugles. Be flexible and take the elk's temperature as you begin to call.
Bugles were commonly used to communicate with troops in battle and to send signals for the men to move around the battlefield.
Instead they're hearing recordings of taps playing from the bells of "ceremonial bugles."
BEFORE THE INVENTION OF RADIO at the end of the 19th century, bugles and trumpets (the difference is minimal: a trumpet is a cylinder topped with a cone, a bugle is just one big cone) were often used to communicate over long distances.
The shrill demented choirs of wailing shells; And bugles calling for them from sad shires."
Others began using "ceremonial bugles"--horns inserted with digital devices that play taps at the push of a button."It's better than nothing, but faking taps just isn't good enough," Baldo said.
And to honour her son's memory, Janice Murray has presented two military bugles to the schools which will go under the name of "endeavour" awards.