bulimia

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Related to bulimics: bulimia nervosa, bulimia

bulimia:

see eating disorderseating disorders,
in psychology, disorders in eating patterns that comprise four categories: anorexia nervosa, bulimia, rumination disorder, and pica. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by self-starvation to avoid obesity.
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bulimia

see ANOREXIA NERVOSA.

Bulimia

 

voracious appetite, severe increase in appetite that usually comes on in the form of an attack and is accompanied by tormenting hunger, general weakness, and pain in the epigastrium. Bulimia occurs in some diseases of the central nervous system and the endocrine system and in certain mental illnesses. Treatment consists in attacking the cause.

bulimia

[bə′lēm·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Excessive, insatiable appetite, seen in psychotic states; a symptom of diabetes mellitus and of certain cerebral lesions. Also known as hyperphagia.

bulimia

1. pathologically insatiable hunger, esp when caused by a brain lesion
2. a disorder characterized by compulsive overeating followed by vomiting: sometimes associated with anxiety about gaining weight
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2005 actress Jane Fonda told a conference of teenage girls in the US: "I was bulimic for 35 years.
"Bulimics tend to respond beautifully to medication, and, in general, if you treat their depression or mood symptoms with medication, the bulimic symptoms also improve," she said.
Bulimics may show weight fluctuations associated with binge/purge cycles.
Male anorexics and bulimics frequently remain in denial by using athletic activity to justify disordered eating behavior.
In the group as a whole, bulimic behavior gradually diminished during the course of the pregnancy.
* Characteristics: Bulimics binge, or consume large amounts of food at one time, they try to rid themselves of what they ate by vomiting, over-exercising, or abusing laxatives or diet pills.
(See Kuhn, Schanberg, Field, Symanski,' Zimmerman, Scafidi, & Roberts, 1991, for a description of the procedure.) Although bulimics show depleted serotonin (Kaye et al., 1984), they are noted to have elevated norepinephrine levels (Robinson, Checkley, & Russell, 1985; Smythe, Bradshaw, & Vining, 1983).
Bulimics remained largely unchanged 6 months later.
But compulsive overeaters differ from bulimics in that compulsive overeaters do not purge after a binge.
Although ipecac use is far from epidemic, therapists say that a sizable minority of their bulimic patients -- people who induce vomiting to purge food after going on a binge or off a diet -- admit to using the substance when they are most desperate and other methods seem inadequate.
In fact, it is worse because, while an alcoholic can manage to avoid alcohol, a bulimic can't avoid food.