bullfight

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bullfight

a traditional Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin American spectacle in which a matador, assisted by banderilleros and mounted picadors, baits and usually kills a bull in an arena
References in periodicals archive ?
He was the author of a lengthy series of profiles of contemporary bullfighters (Los ases del toreo; Aces of the Bullfight) and of outstanding bullfighters in history (Los reyes del toreo; The Kings of Bullfighting).
Stein's admiration for the bullfighter Joselito (which she relates on the first page of Death in the Afternoon--the only place she appears by name) and her own early appreciation of Spain and its culture (Geography and Plays, 1922) may have spurred Hemingway to outdo her without ever acknowledging debt.
When Pilar discusses the smell of death (Chapter Nineteen), she mentions not less than seven bullfighters. The most famous of them all is identified only by his first name (Jose, Joselito) and the place of his death (Talavera) - sufficient detail for Pilar's primary narratees to identify Jose Gomez Ortega, who for many years and by many critics was considered the best matador of the twentieth century.
Then, in the video, fellow bullfighters are seen coming to Macias' rescue; they hold his throat up with a visible puncture wound.
The law also limits to three the number of animals that bullfighters can spar with, for a maximum duration of ten minutes per bull.
He once said: "I had always felt a great admiration for bullfighters "and the festival, but I was ashamed to say I wanted to be a bullfighter and a hero, as I saw them." He began his career as an apprentice at the Las Ventas bull ring in Madrid.
It centres on the love triangle between Manolo (Luna), a matador from a long line of bullfighters, heroic warrior Joaquin (Tatum) and Maria (Saldana), a rebellious woman who rails against convention.
This note explores some of the historical events related to bulls, bullfights, and bullfighters from the fiesta fictionalized in The Sun Also Rises.
Written by a husband-and-wife team of local journalists, this is a biography of Ted DeGrazia, a mid-20th century painter whose commercially popular work often featured bullfighters or Native American stereotypes in a naive style.
When we heard about women bullfighters, and we heard that Cristina Sanchez was retiring, we were in San Francisco, and so we were far away from our own culture, and I think that really caught our attention, like wow....