bully

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bully

any of various small freshwater fishes of the genera Gobiomorphus and Philynodon of New Zealand
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cyberbully

A person who uses the Internet and social media to harass or intimidate someone. Tweets and texts are a common cyberbullying venue, and email messages with phony from: addresses are a way to reach people without identifying the sender. An "anonymous blog" keeps the writer's identity a secret but allows the blogger to make harmful comments. See Internet troll, fake news, email spoofing and rage.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Surviving Bullies Workbook: Skills to Help Protect You from Bullying Lulu, www.lulu.com, $14.99
It discusses the peer ecologies of bullies, and how peer groups can both positively and negatively influence bully behavior.
Experts emphasize that not all kids from troubled homes become bullies, and not all bullies come from troubled homes.
It's also not a good idea to tell children to ignore or avoid bullies. Not being held accountable only empowers bullies.
Inundated with information regarding how to stop children from bullying other children in school, educators' primary question at the end of a one-day seminar for teachers in Virginia on bullying behavior was "What can we do about teachers who bully?" (Bullies, Victims & Bystanders Conference, 2002).
The effects of bullying can be severe, affecting those involved including the bullied, the bullies and those who witness it long after their school days have ended.
Her parents talked to her teacher and he had the bullies apologize to Ja'Nessa and write her a note saying they were sorry.
'With basically minors involved, the jurisdiction falls on department heads of schools to give administrative sanctions on bullies. But in case bullying results in death or physical harm, the criminal aspect comes in and it falls under Republic Act 9344 or the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act,' Saro said.
While a burly kid outside of the home may be the stereotype of a childhood bully, the study suggested that the most damaging bullies are those who tease, make fun of and physically hurt their brothers and sisters.
When bullies cause such grievous harm, it's difficult to even consider giving them a second chance.
Bullying has become a pandemic social disease in Malaysia that seven out of 10 children believe legislation is needed to protect them from bullies, according to the Children4Change nationwide survey released today in conjunction with World Children's Day.
As a result, researchers and practitioners have been hesitant to label young children as 'bullies' because of the inherent difficulties in applying the traditional definition of bullying consistently (Hanish, Kochenderfer-Ladd, Fabes, Martin, & Dennings, 2004).